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Thread: Health Issues

  1. #81
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    Aspirin for heart attack: Chew or swallow?

    For an aspirin to save your life during a heart attack, you need to chew it.

    May 2005

    You’'ve always been healthy, but you seemed to run out of steam at your wife’s 60th birthday dinner last week. And now your chest feels heavy, as if you’re in a vise. You take some antacids, even though it’s 7:00 a.m. and you haven’t even had breakfast. But you get no relief, and the pain is spreading to your jaw and shoulder. You call your wife, who takes one look at you and rushes to the phone. After calling 911, she brings you an aspirin and some water.

    Your wife got it right: You may be having a heart attack, and you need to get to the hospital fast. You also need to get some aspirin into your system quickly — but should you chew the tablet or swallow it?

    The reason you need aspirin is the same reason you should call 911 without delay: A heart attack is a dynamic event, and early intervention can limit the damage. The paramedics can give you oxygen and medication, and they’ll monitor your blood pressure and heart rhythm to forestall complications as they speed you to the ER. In the hospital, doctors will take EKGs and blood tests to see if you are having a heart attack; if so, they will usually try to open the blocked artery with an angioplasty and stent or, if that’s not available, with a clot-busting drug.

    It’s modern cardiology at its best, and it has improved considerably the outlook for heart attack victims. But how can a humble aspirin tablet add to high-tech medicine, and why is speed so important?

    Most heart attacks develop when a cholesterol-laden plaque in a coronary artery ruptures. Relatively small plaques, which produce only partial blockages, are the ones most likely to rupture. When they do, they attract platelets to their surface. Platelets are the tiny blood cells that trigger blood clotting. A clot, or thrombus, builds up on the ruptured plaque. As the clot grows, it blocks the artery. If the blockage is complete, it deprives a portion of the heart muscle of oxygen. As a result, muscle cells die — and it’s a heart attack.

    Aspirin helps by inhibiting platelets. Only a tiny amount is needed to inhibit all the platelets in the bloodstream; in fact, small amounts are better than high doses. But since the clot grows minute by minute, time is of the essence.

    To find out how aspirin works fastest, researchers in Texas asked 12 volunteers to take a standard 325-mg dose of aspirin in three different ways: by swallowing a tablet with 4 ounces of water, by chewing the tablet for 30 seconds before swallowing it, or by drinking 4 ounces of water with Alka-Seltzer. Each subject tried all three methods on an empty stomach on different days. The scientists monitored blood levels of aspirin and its active ingredient, salicylate, at frequent intervals, and they also measured thromboxane B2 (TxB2), an indicator of platelet activation that drops as platelets are inhibited.

    By all three measurements, chewed aspirin worked fastest. It needed only five minutes to reduce TxB2 concentrations by 50%; the Alka-Seltzer took almost 8 minutes, and the swallowed tablet took 12 minutes. Similarly, it took 14 minutes for the chewed tablet to produce maximal platelet inhibition; it took Alka-Seltzer 16 minutes and the swallowed tablet 26 minutes (see graph below).

    Aspirin can help prevent heart attacks in patients with coronary artery disease and in healthy men over 50 years of age. Only low doses, between 81 and 325 mg a day, are needed. But people who think they may be having an attack need an extra 325 mg of aspirin, and they need it as quickly as possible. For the best results, chew a single full-sized 325-mg tablet, but don’t use an enteric-coated tablet, which will act slowly even if chewed. And don’t forget to call 911, then your doctor. It’s a contemporary update on the old reminder to take two aspirin and call in the morning — and it’s good advice to chew over.


    http://www.health.harvard.edu/fhg/up...ate0505a.shtml

  2. #82
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    Black Cumin seed oil is extracted from black cumin seed, also referred to as black seed, kalonji seeds, has the scientific name of Nigella Sativa.

    The plant is mostly found in Middle East and in this region of earth, it is popularly known as haba al-barakah, meaning blessed seeds for many of its palliative properties. Black Cumin is also variously called as nutmeg flower, fennel flower and Roman coriander.
    Black cumin seed is a very popular spice variety, and it is also used for garnishing major food items both in Oriental and European nations.
    It is so notable a variety of black cumin seed that we can refer to the famous phrase uttered by Prophet Mohammed that black cumin seed could cure anything but death itself.
    in fact, the uses of black cumin seed oil and extract for curing cancer is well known.

    “Seeds of the black cumin plant could cure anything but death itself “- The prophet Mohammad

    http://www.rainsoulwellness.com

  3. #83

  4. #84
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    Doctors Are Now Warning: If You Use Aluminum Foil, Stop It Or Face Deadly Consequences

    by David Vanallen - December 16, 2016

    Aluminum foils is one of the most used kitchen items. Except for cooking, it's also used for wrapping and even for treatment of common ailments. However, a recent discovery has shed new light on this kitchen staple.

    For one thing, aluminum is a neurotoxic heavy metal that has an adverse effect on brain function, and has even been linked to Alzheimer's disease. Medical experts warn that exposure to this metal may result in mental decline, as well as loss of coordination, bodily control, memory, and balance. Needless to mention, the effects can be long-lasting.

    The afore-mentioned study also found that cooking with aluminum foil possibly affects the bones as well, owing to the fact that the metal accumulates inside the bones taking over calcium in the competition for the tight bone space. The end result is loss of the much needed calcium for proper bone health.

    In addition, researchers have also linked cooking with aluminum foil with pulmonary fibrosis and other respiratory issues due to inhalation of aluminum particles. Grilling with aluminum produces the same effect.

    Although we've long been familiar with the fact that aluminum cans are a serious health threat, somehow tin foil was never a subject for discussion.

    What most people are unaware of is that when exposed to high temperatures, aluminum foil releases parts of the metal into the food. Even if these tiny pieces are not released, chemical leaching of aluminum may still occur when some spices or lemons are added.

    Dr. Essam Zubaidy, a chemical engineering researcher at the American University of Sharjah, has studied the effects of aluminum on cooking. He discovered that one meal cooked in aluminum foil can basically contain up to 400mg of aluminum.

    In his words, "The higher the temperature, the more the leaching. Foil is not suitable for cooking and is not suitable for using with vegetables like tomatoes, citrus juice or spices."

    According to the World Health Organization, the RDA (recommended daily allowance) for aluminum is limited to 60mg per day.


    http://reflectionofmind.org/doctors-...-consequences/


 

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