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Thread: Good Phone Apps

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    Default Good Phone Apps

    How it works

    WhatsApp Messenger is a cross-platform mobile messaging app which allows you to exchange messages without having to pay for SMS. WhatsApp Messenger is available for iPhone, BlackBerry, Android, Windows Phone and Nokia and yes, those phones can all message each other! Because WhatsApp Messenger uses the same internet data plan that you use for email and web browsing, there is no cost to message and stay in touch with your friends.

    In addition to basic messaging WhatsApp users can create groups, send each other unlimited images, video and audio media messages.

    http://www.whatsapp.com/


    WhatsApp Violates International Law
    http://forum.netmuslims.com/showthread.php?10841-Tech-news&p=64659&viewfull=1#post64659

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    For those who don't have a smart phone or wants to use the apps for the phone on their pc can use bluestacks app player. Downloaded it here , and after installing just click on Messaging or top 25 apps to lcate whichever app you want and click on it to download and install.

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    The app that detects skin cancer - and could be more accurate than a DOCTOR


    • The DermoScreen app works with a high-quality dermoscope attachment
    • This magnifying lens illuminates and scans unusual looking lesions
    • It uses industry guidelines to highlight potentially cancerous cells
    • At-risk patients would then be referred to a dermatologist
    • During tests, the app was accurate in 85% of cases based on visual characteristics - higher than the 50% to 70% of family doctors
    • It is now being evaluated for further testing before being released




    As the height of summer approaches, doctors are warning people about the risks of skin cancer, urging them to get any unusual looking moles checked out by doctors.

    But the process of investigating these lesions can be a long-winded and, in some cases, complicated process.

    A Houston professor is hoping to drastically cut the time it takes to identify cancerous cells using a smartphone app and attachment - and he even claims it is more accurate than doctors.

    The app, called DermoScreen, is now being evaluated at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Centre.

    THE DOCTOR MOLE APP

    There is an app already on the market that claims to spot potentially cancerous moles and lesions.

    Doctor Mole' uses augmented reality to check moles for irregularities in size, shape, color and border.

    After taking a picture of a mole, the user is presented with a color-coded 'risk' level for each of these characteristics.

    The app can archive and compare data to check for any changes in a mole. It will also remind the user when it's time to check a mole again.

    But the Doctor Mole app should not be used as an alternative to seeing a doctor.
    If successful, it could make quick and inexpensive screening a reality for millions of people who lack access to medical specialists.

    George Zouridakis, professor of engineering technology at Houston University, has worked on the project since 2005.

    The goal is to provide quick screening in rural areas or in the developing world, where specialty medical care generally isn't available, he said.

    Early testing found the device to be accurate 85 per cent of the time, based on visual characteristics.

    This is slightly lower than the 90 per cent accuracy rate for dermatologists, but more accurate than family doctors, who have an accuracy average of between 50 and 70 per cent, according to official U.S industry figures.

    Once launched, patients would be referred for follow-up if the lesions spotted on the app were suspected to be cancerous.

    In addition to a mobile phone, the technology uses a dermoscope attachment - a special magnifying lens that costs about $500 (£294) and provides special illumination of the area being photographed.

    Before the app becomes widely available, Zouridakis said he wants to make sure it is as accurate as possible.

    He is also looking into other diagnostic uses for the technology, such as testing the deviceís ability to screen Buruli ulcer, a flesh-eating bacterial disease, in Africa.

    Dr. Ana Ciurea, assistant professor of dermatology at MD Anderson, said the project is in the early stages but looks promising.

    ĎOur research with Dr. Zouridakis on his promising iPhone app will focus on evaluating its use for risk assessment and as a screening tool for early detection of melanomas,í she said.

    ĎWe are in early stages of planning and approval for this project, but such an application, if validated, has the potential for widespread use to ultimately improve patient care.í



    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencete...ing-moles.html

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    Duster, a Handy App That Tells You Which ĎFriendsí You Should Delete on Facebook



    Any early adopter of Facebook has probably friended a few people whom ó to this day ó she has no recollection of meeting. Perhaps youíd rather not share your personal thoughts and photos with these random people?

    Well, Iíve got just the tool for you, in time for spring cleaning: Duster.

    The free app connects to Facebook and analyzes which of your friends youíve barely interacted with lately. Within a couple of seconds, itíll offer recommendations, in the form of a pinboard of forgotten faces, of people to remove from your social circle.

    If youíre actively looking to declutter, the tool can offer up some helpful options, pointing out folks who are not a part of your Facebook life.

    Oh, and one fringe benefit: The app can also finger accounts that belong to friends you may not interact with much on Facebook, but whom you are genuinely interested in. So as much as this is an app meant to clear the residue of forgotten acquaintances, it might motivate you to rekindle fading friendships, too.

    But, of course, there are some caveats.

    As you probably know, unfriending is a pretty loaded activity. Even if I havenít spoken to someone in years, she may one day look up my page and realize she doesnít have access to my profile anymore. It feels very final, and that scares me.

    Then there are people I have known and silently followed, fascinated, for years, but have never interacted with since then. These people satisfy my ďWhat if?Ē void, my voyeuristic itch, and thereís no way Iíll ever sacrifice that for a pared-down friends list.

    So the takeaway is this: No matter how easy Duster might make it to remove Facebook friends, thereís no way it can accurately gauge which ones youíve really lost interest in. Long live passive Facebook acquaintances!

    Regardless, hereís how you use it:

    1. Go to Dusterapp.com and click Start Duster.


    2. The app will ask for permission to access your Facebook accountís information, since thatís the only way it can see who your friends are. Donít worry: It wonít remove any friends without your explicit permission.



    3. From there, itíll populate a list of the people gathering dust on your friends list. Looks like I havenít interacted with Tao Lin in a while. Shame.



    4. After thinking it over, you can choose to click either Hide or Dust! The Hide option allows you to keep that friend, while the Dust! option brings you to an unfriending page.

    As it turns out, the only one Iím brave enough to unfriend is my college friendís cat. Sorry, Pika.



    And thatís it! You can try Duster here. Beware, college friendsí cats everywhere.


    https://www.yahoo.com/tech/try-duste...841760589.html

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    PhotoMath on Windows Phone lets you solve math problems instantly

    PhotoMath is a real-time equation solver, perfect for any college student (or professional) who needs help solving math problems -- or just hates solving them by hand.

    The app, which is available for Windows Phone and iOS (with an Android version coming in early 2015), allows users to point their camera at almost any math problem, press the capture button, and see accurate results displayed almost instantly on the screen -- along with the steps, in order, to solving a problem.

    At current, PhotoMath supports solutions for four mathematical concepts: arithmetic expressions, fractions and decimals, powers and roots, and simple linear equations. The app won't help you solve a complex calculus problem, or a multi-variable algebraic expression (although it does support simple algebraic expressions), but for most simple math problems that you'd rather not solve because of time constraints or lack of motivation, the app works as promised.

    PhotoMath is similar in concept to Word Lens, an app for iOS and Android which utilizes photo recognition to translate phrases and sentences between 7 different languages, including Spanish, Russian, and German. Both apps have serious promise for simplifying concepts which once took significant time devotion to master, which is exciting to consider as the future of smartphone technology.

    You can see a video of PhotoMath in action below:




 

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