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    Default Job help Resources

    Should You Fake Your Job References?

    By Rachel Zupek, CareerBuilder.com writer

    Every day, William Schmidt gives job seekers with a not-so-great job history, a gap on their résumé or even a criminal record, a second chance. How does he do it? He fabricates job references to cover up their sordid pasts.

    Schmidt is the founder of CareerExcuse.com, a Web site that says it will fill any gap on your résumé by acting as your past employer. It will go as far as creating a new company with an accompanying phone number, logo, Web site and LinkedIn profile. He says the site is designed to "help our subscribers meet the needs of the modern day job market."

    "Many of our subscribers tell me how a bad reference from a previous employer is akin to having a criminal record and is preventing them from providing for their family. All they ask is for a second chance," Schmidt says.

    While Schmidt says he feels good about the service he provides for job seekers, naturally, not everyone shares his opinion. After all, not only is it unethical to lie about anything on your job application, but some argue that it puts those who have legitimate references at an unfair disadvantage.

    "It's like using a professional photographer, who helps you look your best, versus using someone else's photo. One is enhancing your appearance, while the other is blatant misrepresentation," says David Wright, author of "Get a Job! Your Guide to Making Successful Career Moves." "People do make mistakes and bad choices. Winners learn from the mistakes while losers try to cover them up, hide them or keep making the same mistakes over and over while expecting different results."

    Is the economy to blame?

    Many people can agree that finding a job today is difficult and that not having anyone in your corner to toot your horn could be detrimental. Schmidt said he got the idea for his company after perusing posts on Twitter, where he said he saw many users asking strangers for references.
    "We understand that there are over 12 million workers who have been fired or let go from former employers in the last eight years. With six applicants for every job today, anyone with a blemish in their career can be left out," Schmidt says.

    Lauren Milligan, résumé expert and job coach for ResuMayday, says that it's sad that job seekers would think they had to fake their references, but that she can see how the poor economy could lead to making desperate choices.

    "If a candidate was previously turned down because of a lack of reference, that otherwise honest person may decide to unethically stack the deck in his or her favor," she says. "It's kind of pathetic that anyone would have to [use a service for a reference], but perhaps it could be that 'rock bottom' that turns around bad behavior."

    Is it worth it?

    Some job seekers may think they need to use a fake reference because they were fired or need to cover a gap in their employment history. Experts say that paying someone to do that for you is likely a waste -- especially since many employers ignore the references you give them anyway.

    "Having consulted on hundreds of hires, I don't care about the three personal references the candidate has given. Anyone can find three people that will swear they can turn water into wine," says Barry Maher, career consultant and owner of Barry Maher & Associates. "I check everything else I can. And not just the last job, which may be a service that will vouch for them, but the job before that and the one before that, all the way down the line."

    Checking references all the way down the line has also become much easier with the advent of social networking sites like Facebook and LinkedIn, which provide a place for you to list your employment history. Employers aren't stupid -- if a few things don't match up, they'll catch on pretty quickly.

    "The good thing about social networking is that the world has become a much smaller, accessible place. The bad thing about social networking is that the world has become a much smaller, accessible place," Milligan says. "Within a few minutes, I believe that anyone with a mid-level of expertise in LinkedIn or Facebook (combined with an elementary-level [Internet] search) could identify fake information. Hiring mistakes are so costly; due diligence can really pay off in a company's recruiting process."

    And while employers cross-reference information that candidates provide them, including references, services like CareerExcuse.com have an answer for that, too.

    "CareerExcuse.com uses [social networks] to our advantage," Schmidt says. "As a matter of fact, it is the Internet and the reliance of the Internet by human resource managers that make our services work so successfully."

    Consequences of your actions

    Every action has a consequence, including providing a fake job reference to a potential employer. Although you may not get caught, you'll likely have to deal with trying to cover up your lies and forever worrying about if you'll get caught.

    "Liars are always going to use lies to try and put themselves at an advantage over honest people," Wright says. "This may be effective in the short run, but over time, honesty wins out because eventually lies do get found out, and liars are exposed for who they really are. As in a great quote attributed to Abraham Lincoln: 'You can fool some of the people all of the time, and all of the people some of the time, but you cannot fool all of the people all of the time.'"

    The truth will set you free

    If you feel the need to use a fake job reference, try these three tips from our experts instead:

    1. Turn your negatives into positives

    "Nothing builds credibility like exposing your own negatives. You can turn them into positives, selling points, even bragging points," Maher says. He gives the example of Clyde Thompson, who "provided us with all the reasons why we may not want to hire him; all the ones that we probably would have brought up on our own once he was out of the room, and a few more we might never have come up. Clyde presented his unemployability in a light made it appear that he'd be a more reliable employee. And his honesty gained him a massive amount of credibility."

    2. Don't give up

    Before giving up and resigning yourself to having no references, Milligan suggests scouring LinkedIn and Facebook to try to reconnect with former colleagues. Or, consider if you've volunteered anywhere, played on a sports team or been a member of industry associations. Reach out to peers from these organizations for a reference.

    "References don't only have to come from supervisors or co-workers," she says. "Perhaps company clients or vendors would have a few good things to say about you."

    If you still can't find anyone to give you reference by the time an employer asks for one, Milligan suggests saying, "Unbelievably, I wasn't able to connect with any of my former supervisors or co-workers after ABC Co. shut down unexpectedly. Thanks to social networking, I'm in the process of trying to find people, but it just hasn't panned out yet. In lieu of that, I would assure you that I wouldn't have been able to achieve (insert career success here) if I wasn't good at my job and I fully expect to create more successes like that one, for you."

    3. Tackle the issue head-on

    Instead of trying to sweep the issue under the rug, be the first one to address it, Wright suggests.

    "If you know you've got something bad that would probably show up on a background check, it can help to be proactive, particularly when you've established some degree of rapport with the hiring manager," he suggests. "Tell them that you want to be upfront with them -- you made a mistake in the past and they'll probably find out anyway, but you'd rather them hear it from you first. By being proactive, you have the opportunity to position it better as well, emphasizing your strengths or how you overcame that experience."


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    Default How Can I Get Hands-On Experience?

    DiceTV: How Can I Get Hands-On Experience?



    The Script

    Ugh, I can see why this is so frustrating! Every one of these job postings asks for experience. How are you supposed to get technical experience if you don't have a job?
    I'll give you the answers to this Catch-22 dilemma during a segment we like to call, "Ask Cat" I'm Cat Miller and this is DiceTV.

    Here's the first question. How can a college student or recent grad acquire hands-on technical experience?

    Participate in internships and student-projects because even unpaid experience counts. Offer your services to nonprofit and community organizations, local political campaigns or entrepreneurs. They often need help with a donor or customer database or Web design and they don't have the funds to hire experienced consultants.

    Here's the next question. Is virtual experience viable?

    Absolutely. Use free software to set-up a virtual lab on your PC, and then teach yourself new skills in a simulated environment. Today, you can host a domain controller, SQL server and a print/storage server on a laptop and with VMware you can throw in a firewall DHCP box as well. Keep a log of your activities, so you can reference them during interviews.

    Is it a good idea to enter contests or work with open source software?

    Working with open source technology is a great way to acquire experience. You can learn JavaScript, PHP, SQL and HTML and then practice your skills by creating mock databases and websites. Software companies source undiscovered talent by hosting annual contests. They're always looking for someone who can create a killer app or an up-and- comer who can solve a difficult technical problem.

    How can experienced IT professionals acquire additional skills?

    Long before there were colleges in every city, aspiring workers apprenticed with experienced professionals to learn a trade or profession. Expand your skills through lateral transfers or volunteer to serve as an assistant on a critical project. Offer to exchange technical knowledge and assignments with a co-worker. Above all, just be creative. Because once you have experience, employers won't care how you got it!

    http://career-resources.dice.com/art..._get?cmpid=216

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    Six Words That Kill Your Resume

    By: NewGradLife

    Words are the name of the game when it comes to resumes, and job seekers need to be strategic in their choice of them. Many of us often use keywords on our resumes, but how do you know which words to choose and which ones to leave out? In answer to those questions, we’ve compiled a brief list of some of the most overused words on resumes. Avoid them whenever possible and choose a more creative alternatives. After knowing which words to avoid, you’ll be ready to construct an eye-catching resume.

    1. Accomplished. Yes, we all know every job seeker is accomplished, otherwise you would have been fired from every job you’d ever had if you never accomplished anything. Instead try: peak performer.

    2. Results-Driven. Everyone’s professional resume starts out with “Results-driven (insert your job title here)”. The only problem is, in the job-search game you don’t want to sound like everyone else; you want to stand out from the crowd. Instead try: performance-driven.

    3. Successful. This is another overused word. We all want to communicate how successful we’ve been so a new employer will think highly of us, but consider some alternative wording versus coming out and saying “hey there, I’m a success.” Instead try: best in class, award-winning, or top performer.

    4. Skillful or Skilled. These are so boring; I hate to see resumes with these words on them. I’m sure you can come up with something much more creative for your resume. If you can’t think of anything, try my recommendations, or if you don’t like them use a thesaurus. Instead try: talented, sharp, or resourceful.

    5. Problem-Solver. Isn’t this a given? We’re ALL problem solvers; if you’re human, you’re a problem solver. Does it really need to be said on your resume? I think not. Instead try: troubleshooter, forward-thinking, or visionary leader.

    6. And last but not least Dedicated and Dependable. Again I have to say boring, boring, boring. Spice up your resume with something creative. Instead try: high potential, quality-driven, or dynamic.

    http://www.divinecaroline.com/22276/95144-six-words-kill-resume

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    No Work History? The Reference Store Will Create A Fake One For You

    Have you done any
    background checks today? How do you know if the company you called is real?

    Before there was the proposed Fair Employment Act of 2011, there was The Reference Store. One of the top reasons your candidate isn’t getting hired these days is because he or she is unemployed. The government is trying to rectify this, having introduced a Senate bill prohibiting discrimination against unemployed job seekers.


    But before that, there was a business created in 2008, called
    The Reference Store, which creates fake employment references for people being turned away from jobs because they are unemployed, fired or have a criminal background, or perhaps have fallen victim to a bad reference from a former employer.

    The Reference Store is, indeed, a legit company (legit in the sense that they exist). Designed to “pull the wool over the eyes” of employment agencies, he told me they really do provide job seekers with a fake company and references, not to mention find housing for people who might have a difficult time if they’re house-hunting on the up and up.

    No kidding, the company actually says on the front page of its website, “We’re your Virtual H.R. Department. We help our clients by providing alternate work histories; and little white lies.”


    They even have a computerized employee screening system to avoid that pesky little employment obstacle called the criminal background check, for “those whose moral compasses have pointed a little off course.”


    The Reference Store falsification process:


    • The client, depending on their career industry, completes a data worksheet.
    • They are assigned a case manager who evaluates it.
    • The case manager develops a best-case scenario.
    • The client gets the option to choose the moral high road (in other words, leaving the meeting) or to sell out.
    • If they choose the latter, the company creates the fake reference, complete with a website, phone number, physical address, HR manager name, and the scenario that makes them the perfect candidate, etc. within 12 hours to 10 business days.
    • The potential employer’s HR department gets to speak to an actual person when calling for references.

    In March, the store began offering a Targeted service, where the client picks a job with a company they’d most like to work for, and The Reference Store comes up with a fake one very similar to the desired position.

    The service is offered worldwide, and soon will have a Spanish-speaking program.


    “We see it as serving a greater cause,” the man on the phone said. “The clients figure out ‘what.’ We tell them how.”





    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    No Work History? The Reference Store Will Create A Fake One For You


    by
    Regan Kohler - August 4, 2011

    Have you done any background checks today? How do you know if the company you called is real?


    Before there was the
    proposed Fair Employment Act of 2011, there was The Reference Store.

    One of the
    top reasons your candidate isn’t getting hired these days is because he or she is unemployed.

    The government is trying to rectify this,
    having introduced a Senate bill prohibiting discrimination against unemployed job seekers.

    But before that, there was a business created in 2008, called
    The Reference Store, which creates fake employment references for people being turned away from jobs because they are unemployed, fired or have a criminal background, or perhaps have fallen victim to a bad reference from a former employer.
    I didn’t believe it at first.

    The only reason I happened to come across it was while I was searching for something in the
    comments on a past article I’d written. Somehow, I’d overlooked a woman’s comment about this service (or maybe I’d assumed it was spam – that does happen).

    It didn’t sound believable, and if it was real, how did they get by without being called out for fraud?

    But the writer directed me to an actual website.

    Intrigued, I called the 800 number, and spoke to one of their personnel, who told me The Reference Store is, indeed, a legit company (legit in the sense that they exist). Designed to “pull the wool over the eyes” of employment agencies, he told me they really do provide job seekers with a fake company and references, not to mention find housing for people who might have a difficult time if they’re house-hunting on the up and up.


    No kidding, the company actually says on the front page of its website, “We’re your Virtual H.R. Department. We help our clients by providing alternate work histories; and little white lies.”


    They even have a computerized employee screening system to avoid that pesky little employment obstacle called the criminal background check, for “those whose moral compasses have pointed a little off course.”


    (Excuse me, I just had to pick myself up off the floor after irony hit me.)


    The nice man I talked to at The Reference Store walked me through the falsification process:


    • The client, depending on their career industry, completes a data worksheet.
    • They are assigned a case manager who evaluates it.
    • The case manager develops a best-case scenario.
    • The client gets the option to choose the moral high road (in other words, leaving the meeting) or to sell out.
    • If they choose the latter, the company creates the fake reference, complete with a website, phone number, physical address, HR manager name, and the scenario that makes them the perfect candidate, etc. within 12 hours to 10 business days.
    • The potential employer’s HR department gets to speak to an actual person when calling for references.

    In March, the store began offering a Targeted service, where the client picks a job with a company they’d most like to work for, and The Reference Store comes up with a fake one very similar to the desired position.

    The service is offered worldwide, and soon will have a Spanish-speaking program.


    “We see it as serving a greater cause,” the man on the phone said. “The clients figure out ‘what.’ We tell them how.”


    He told me that The Reference Store is staffed by former military intelligence professionals “trained in developing smoke and mirrors” scenarios, and some former HR professionals, as well.


    I still didn’t get it – how does it bypass employment fraud?


    The website
    says it’s perfectly legal.

    “Misinformation isn’t a crime,” it states at the top of its FAQs list.


    The man I spoke to said that not one client has yet been discovered, though the website warns, “If the deception is discovered, you could very well be terminated; evicted or suffer embarrassment and humiliation.”


    How much does it cost?


    For a standard plan, you pay a $99.95 deposit, and $29.95 for each additional month.


    Of course, good covert ops take time.


    “Quick and easy is how you clean a toilet bowl,” my source told me.


    However, he added, two of their plans have a 100% success rate, so they strongly encourage clients to follow their advice. Those who haven’t found jobs typically haven’t followed the advice, he said.


    “The decisions are always up to the client,” he added.


    The Reference Store has a few standards, though. He told me that under no circumstances will they find people employment in K-12 education, law enforcement or other government agencies, legal or fiduciary organizations, or health care.


    “That is just not something that we are comfortable supporting,” he said.


    They also refuse to submit false statements to any court, so you’re on your own if you get caught.


    The company has a number of people who were willing to share success stories online, some of whom claim it an act of God.


    Eric S. from Texas said, “I couldn’t find work with a Prison record. Nobody would hire me. You guys really know how to sugarcoat the past.”


    Rosa D. from Arizona called the services “too good to be true.”


    Honestly, there’s very little truth involved.



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    How Do You Know When to Change Jobs?



    One of the hardest things about a job is knowing when to leave it. How do you know when it’s time to leave a company? There are obvious signs, but the two most important are if you're no longer learning and if you're no longer having fun. The tough part is realizing when those two things have happened. Frequently we are all too close to the situation to see the forest for the trees, to take a step back and objectively evaluate if we're at the right job at the right company at a particular time in our lives.



    I’ve left three jobs in my career: I left investment banking (Goldman Sachs) to go into private equity investing (TPG Capital); I left private equity to co-found a startup (Hotwire); and I left online travel (Expedia) to help found another startup (Zillow). In each of those three career transitions, one person was indispensible in pushing me in the right direction: my wife. In each case, she saw something that I couldn’t – she saw that I was unhappy at work. She’s what I call my “career mirror”, someone who sees things about you which you can’t. Your career mirror can be a friend, a spouse, a partner, a parent, a sibling, a life coach or a psychiatrist. Pretty much the only person it can’t be is you.



    If you don’t have a career mirror, get one. And once you have one, follow that person’s advice.

    http://www.linkedin.com/today/post/article/20130328163847-2298009-do-you-have-a-career-mirror
    Last edited by islamirama; Apr-21-2013 at 04:35 AM.

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    Due to competition it is true that finding a job is very difficult task however you should prepare to yourself very well and always search about your profession. Thanks for sharing; those articles are very useful for enhancement in knowledge.

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    How to Quit Your Job without Burning Bridges


    You’ve done it. You’ve decided that it’s the right time to quit your job and move elsewhere in your career. Now for the real task — telling your boss.

    Putting in your resignation can be a very uncomfortable experience, especially if you like the people you work with. Even if you hate your position / coworkers, are close to being fired, or are excited start your new job, it can be challenging to resign tactfully.

    It’s important that you handle your resignation just as carefully as you would plan for an interview. You never know when you might need a reference from your current employer, so it’s important to tread carefully when quitting.

    Consider the following tips to make your transition as smooth as possible:

    Notify your current employer the next business day.

    As soon as you make the decision to leave your current company, plan on having a conversation with your boss the next business day. There’s no point in waiting to have a direct conversation about your transition; and you’ll allow your boss to begin the hiring process immediately.

    By waiting until the next business day, you’ll have time to draft up a formal resignation letter and organize your thoughts for the meeting.

    Give two weeks notice (at least).

    Hiring the ideal candidate takes time. Your employer has to revisit your job description (and update it if necessary), advertise the position, interview candidates, and make a final decision.

    If you enjoyed your role, have a senior title, or are the expert in your department, it’s considerate to give an extra week (or more) notice. Not only will it minimize the impact of you leaving, but it will show your new employer that you are a dedicated employee.

    Write a formal resignation letter.

    In a time where mobile devices allow for instant communication, you might think a written letter is “old school” or inconvenient. However, they are a great tool to use when quitting your job.

    A resignation letter is a great way to outline the details of your transition. While it should be brief (no more than one page, single-sided), it should highlight the following:


    • What you enjoyed most about your position.
    • Your last day of employment.
    • Any special needs, including days that you will be with your new employer for new hire paperwork or training.
    • A brief statement that you want to help make the transition as smooth as possible.


    A written resignation letter should be used to complement a formal meeting with your employer, not substitute for it. Print a copy (I’d advise printing it on resume paper as a sign of respect) for each of the people that you reported to. Instead of leaving the letters to be discovered by your boss, present them when you have your resignation meeting. This will allow you to answer any immediate questions from your employer.

    Educate your team.

    Spend the last few weeks of your job setting your colleagues up for success. Document processes, outstanding projects, and other details of your role to be passed on to the next person in your position. Set up training sessions to cover best practices, workflow processes, or any other “tribal knowledge” that will save your team time.

    If your replacement is hired quickly (and your employer allows it), focus your energy on setting them up for success during your last week. Train them on as much as you can during the week, and also give them a chance to work independently with you shadowing.

    Maintain a positive attitude.

    No matter what feelings you have towards your current employer, your last few weeks should be used to leave a lasting impression. Show up on time, talk positively about the company and colleagues, work diligently, and most importantly — smile!

    Provide honest feedback.

    If you were a good employee, chances are that you will be asked to participate in an exit interview. This is a great way to let your boss know your thoughts about the company, culture, processes, and people — as long as it is shared in a constructive manner.

    Salary alone is probably not why you’re leaving your company, especially if you liked the work that you were doing. Prior to the exit interview, prepare a list of suggestions that you want to discuss with your employer. Your boss will find this honest feedback invaluable.

    By approaching your resignation and final weeks respectfully, you will maintain a positive relationship with your current employer. You never know when you might need to ask them to be a reference in the future!


    http://www.linkedin.com/today/post/a...0qj1GLUxHKfSk1

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    THINGS YOU SHOULD REMOVE FROM YOUR RESUME IMMEDIATELY



    Hiring managers rarely have the time or resources to look at each résumé closely, and they typically spend about six seconds on their initial fit/no fit decision. If you want to pass that test, you need to have some solid qualifications — and the perfect resume to highlight them.

    Here are 34 things you should strike from your resume right now.

    1. An objective

    If you applied, it's already obvious you want the job.

    If you're in a unique situation, such as changing industries completely, it may be useful to include a brief summary.

    2. Irrelevant work experiences


    Yes, you might have been the "king of making milkshakes" at the restaurant you worked for in high school. But unless you are planning on redeeming that title, it is time to get rid of all that clutter.

    But as Alyssa Gelbard, career expert and founder of career-consulting firm Resume Strategists points out: Past work experience that might not appear to be directly relevant to the job at hand might show another dimension, depth, ability, or skill that actually is relevant or applicable.

    Only include this experience if it really showcases additional skills that can translate to the position you're applying for.

    3. Personal details

    Don't include your marital status, religious preference, or Social Security number.

    This might have been the standard in the past, but all this information could lead to discrimination, which is illegal, so there's no need to include it.

    4. Your full mailing address

    A full street address is the first thing Amanda Augustine, a career-advice expert for TopResume, looks for to immediately cut from a résumé.

    "Nobody needs to have that on their résumé anymore, and, to be quite honest, it's a security concern," she tells Business Insider.

    5. More than one phone number

    Augustine suggests including only one phone number on your résumé, and that number should really be your cellphone, so that you can control who answers your incoming phone calls, when, and what the voice mail sounds like.

    6. Your hobbies


    In many cases, nobody cares. If it's not relevant to the job you're applying for, it's a waste of space and a waste of the company's time.

    "Also, you don't want employers trying to contact you in five different places, because then you have to keep track of that," she says.

    7. Blatant lies

    A CareerBuilder survey asked 2,000 hiring managers for memorable resume mistakes, and blatant lies were a popular choice. One candidate claimed to be the former CEO of the company to which he was applying, another claimed to be a Nobel Prize winner, and one more claimed he attended a college that didn't exist.

    Rosemary Haefner, chief human-resources officer at CareerBuilder, says these lies may be "misguided attempts to compensate for lacking 10o% of the qualifications specified in the job posting."

    But Haefner says candidates should concentrate on the skills they can offer, rather than the skills they can't offer.

    "Hiring managers are more forgiving than job seekers may think," Haefner explains. "About 42% of employers surveyed said they would consider a candidate who met only three out of five key qualifications for a specific role."

    8. Too much text


    When you use a 0.5-inch margin and eight-point font in an effort to get everything to fit on one page, this is an "epic fail," says J.T. O'Donnell, a career and workplace expert, founder of career-advice site Careerealism.com, and author of "Careerealism: The Smart Approach to a Satisfying Career."

    She recommends lots of white space and no more than a 0.8 margin.

    Augustine agrees
    , warning particularly against dense blocks of text.

    "Let's be honest: You're looking this over quickly, you're glancing through it, your eyes glaze over when you get to a big, long paragraph," she says.

    9. Too many bullets

    In the same vein, you can also overload your résumé with too many bullet points, which Augustine calls "death by bullets."

    "If absolutely everything is bulleted, it has the same effect as big dense blocks of text — your eyes just glaze over it," she says.

    Augustine explains that bullets are only to be used to draw attention to the most important information. "If you bullet everything, everything is important, which means really nothing stands out," she says.

    10. Time off

    If you took time off to travel or raise a family, Gelbard doesn't recommend including that information on your résumé. "In some countries, it is acceptable to include this information, especially travel, but it is not appropriate to include that in the body of a résumé in the US."

    11. Details that give away your age

    If you don't want to be discriminated against for a position because of your age, it's time to remove your graduation date, says Catherine Jewell, author of "New Résumé, New Career."

    Another surprising way your résumé could give away your age: double spaces after a period.

    12. References

    If your employers want to speak to your references, they'll ask you. Also, it's better if you have a chance to tell your references ahead of time that a future employer might be calling.

    If you write "references upon request" at the bottom of your résumé, you're merely wasting a valuable line, career coach Eli Amdur says.

    13. Inconsistent formatting

    The format of your résumé is just as important as its content, Augustine says.

    She says the best format is the format that will make it easiest for the hiring manager to scan your résumé and still be able to pick out your key qualifications and career goals.

    Once you pick a format, stick with it. If you write the day, month, and year for one date, then use that same format throughout the rest of the résumé.

    14. Personal pronouns

    Your résumé shouldn't include the words "I," "me," "she," or "my," says Tina Nicolai, executive career coach and founder of Resume Writers' Ink.

    "Don't write your résumé in the third or first person. It's understood that everything on your résumé is about you and your experiences."

    15. Present tense for a past job

    Never describe past work experience using the present tense. Only your current job should be written in the present tense, Gelbard says.

    16. A less-than-professional email address

    If you still use an old email address, like BeerLover123@gmail.com or CuteChick4life@yahoo.com, it's time to pick a new one.
    It only takes a minute or two, and it's free.

    17. Any unnecessary, obvious words

    Amdur says there is no reason to put the word "phone" in front of the actual number.

    "It's pretty silly. They know it's your phone number." The same rule applies to email.

    18. Your current business-contact info

    Amdur writes at NorthJersey.com:
    "This is not only dangerous; it's stupid. Do you really want employers calling you at work? How are you going to handle that? Oh, and by the way, your current employer can monitor your emails and phone calls. So if you're not in the mood to get fired, or potentially charged with theft of services (really), then leave the business info off."

    19. Headers, footers, tables, images, charts

    These fancy embeddings will have hiring managers thinking, "Could you not?"

    While a well-formatted header and footer may look professional, and some cool tables, images, or charts may boost your credibility, they also confuse the applicant-tracking systems that companies use nowadays, Augustine tells Business Insider.

    The system will react by scrambling up your résumé and spitting out a poorly formatted one that may no longer include your header or charts. Even if you were an ideal candidate for the position, now the hiring manager has no way to contact you for an interview.

    20. Your boss' name

    Don't include your boss' name on your résumé unless you're OK with your potential employer contacting him or her. Even then, Gelbard says the only reason your boss' name should be on your résumé is if the person is someone noteworthy, and if it would be really impressive.

    21. Company-specific jargon

    "Companies often have their own internal names for things like customized software, technologies, and processes that are only known within that organization and not by those who work outside of it," Gelbard says. "Be sure to exclude terms on your résumé that are known only to one specific organization."

    22. Social-media URLs that are not related to the targeted position

    Links to your opinionated blogs, Pinterest page, or Instagram account have no business taking up prime résumé real estate. "Candidates who tend to think their personal social media sites are valuable are putting themselves at risk of landing in the 'no' pile," Nicolai says.

    "But you should list relevant URLs, such as your LinkedIn page or any others that are professional and directly related to the position you are trying to acquire," she says.

    23. More than 15 years of experience

    When you start including jobs from before 2000, you start to lose the hiring manager's interest.

    Your most relevant experience should be from the past 15 years, so hiring managers only need to see that, Augustine says.

    On the same note, never include dates on education and certifications that are older than 15 years.

    24. Salary information

    "Some people include past hourly rates for jobs they held in college," Nicolai says. This information is unnecessary and may send the wrong message.

    Amy Hoover, president of Talent Zoo, says you also shouldn't address your desired salary in a résumé. "This document is intended to showcase your professional experience and skills. Salary comes later in the interview process."

    25. Outdated fonts

    "Don't use Times New Roman and serif fonts, as they're outdated and old-fashioned," Hoover says. "Use a standard, sans-serif font like Arial."

    Also, be aware of the font size, she says. Your goal should be to make it look nice and sleek — but also easy to read.

    26. Fancy fonts

    Curly-tailed fonts are also a turn-off, according to O'Donnell. "People try to make their résumé look classier with a fancy font, but studies show they are harder to read and the recruiter absorbs less about you."

    27. Annoying buzzwords

    CareerBuilder asked 2,201 US hiring managers: "What résumé terms are the biggest turnoffs?" They cited words and phrases such as, "best of breed," "go-getter," "think outside the box," "synergy," and "people pleaser."

    Terms employers do like to see on résumés include: "achieved," "managed," "resolved," and "launched" — but only if they're used in moderation.

    28. Reasons you left a company or position

    Candidates often think, "If I explain why I left the position on my résumé, maybe my chances will improve."

    "Wrong," Nicolai says. "Listing why you left is irrelevant on your résumé. It's not the time or place to bring up transitions from one company to the next."

    Use your interview to address this.

    29. Your GPA

    Once you're out of school, your grades aren't so relevant.

    If you're a new college graduate and your GPA was a 3.8 or higher — it's OK to leave it. But, if you're more than three years out of school, or if your GPA was lower than a 3.8, ditch it.

    30. A photo of yourself

    This may become the norm at some point in the future, but it's just weird — and tacky and distracting — to include a photo with your résumé for now.

    31. An explanation of why you want the job

    That's what the cover letter and interviews are for!

    Your résumé is not the place to start explaining why you'd be a great fit or why you want the job. Your skills and qualifications should be able to do that for you — and if they don't, then your résumé is either in bad shape, or this isn't the right job for you.

    32. Opinions, not facts

    Don't try to sell yourself by using all sorts of subjective words to describe yourself, O'Donnell says. "I'm an excellent communicator" or "highly organized and motivated" are opinions of yourself and not necessarily the truth. "Recruiters want facts only. They'll decide if you are those things after they meet you," she says.

    33. Generic explanations of accomplishments

    Don't just say you accomplished X, Y, or Z — show it by quantifying the facts.

    For instance, instead of, "Grew revenues" try, "X project resulted in an Y% increase in revenues."

    34. Short-term employment

    Avoid including a job on your résumé if you only held the position for a short period of time, Gelbard says. You should especially avoid including jobs you were let go from or didn't like.



    Source: Business Insider, Jacquelyn Smith and Rachel Gillett

  9. #9
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    This Is What Recruiters Look For On Your LinkedIn Profile

    What catches their eye—or pass you by? You might be surprised.


    When you’re looking for a job, your LinkedIn profile is a 24/7 information resource for the recruiters who are looking for talent. In fact, in the Jobvite 2016 Recruiter Nation Report, 87% of recruiters find LinkedIn most effective when vetting candidates during the hiring process.
    But what really catches a recruiter’s eye when they’re scrolling through your profile? Here, several weighed in about profiles that make them reach out—or recoil.

    Incomplete Profiles Are A Turn-Off


    When Cassandre Joseph, senior talent acquisition visionary and strategist at recruitment firm Korn Ferry, looks at a profile, she wants to see your work experience, education, and accomplishments. Incomplete profiles make it more difficult to determine whether you’re the best match for the job, because she can’t get the whole picture. It’s a bad first impression, she says.

    "I find somebody's profile and it says they've worked at, according to the profile, four different places simultaneously. They're adding the new places, but not putting end dates. That says they haven't updated their LinkedIn profile in X amount of years," she says.

    Don’t Use Selfies

    Your profile photo makes the first impression, so put a little effort into it, says resume expert and retained search consultant Donna Svei. It should look professional and representative of the job you are seeking. Selfies and vacation photos tell recruiters you couldn’t be bothered to make yourself look more professional.

    "People can easily evaluate their profile photos using Photofeeler.com and Snappr.com," says Svei.

    Who You "Know" Matters

    Profiles with just a few contacts are also unappealing, says Molly O'Malley, a tenured recruiter at Adams Keegan, a national HR management and employer services provider. The most effective people have robust networks, and your LinkedIn profile should represent that. You don’t need thousands, but 300 or more is ideal, she says So, beef up your contacts before you look for a new job.

    Discrepancies Are Red Flags

    Joseph says recruiters often look at profiles to confirm information about a candidate. So when your dates of employment, job titles, or other facts are different on your profile than they are on your resume, a recruiter might worry about how detail-oriented you are—or if there’s reason to believe that you’re not being truthful on one or the other.

    No One Has Time For A Long, Dense Summary

    Think of your summary like a copywriter would, Svei says. Highlight what’s in it for recruiters to contact you, such as your achievements, honors, and success stories. Use short copy blocks and bullet points so they can read your summary easily. As more recruiters use mobile devices, your copy should be easy to read on small screens. Svei says it’s also critical to include keywords about your industry for easy searchability.

    Your Headline Matters More Than You Know

    Recruiters may also find your LinkedIn profile via Google instead of the platform itself, Svei says. Google search results will typically include your location and the professional headline that appears under your name on your profile. Make the most of that headline by clarifying your industry and job function.

    Stop The Jargon

    If your title is something along the lines of "supreme conveyer of IT knowledge" or "social media ninja," don’t expect a recruiter to try to figure out what you do, O’Malley says. Make your job title and what your company does clear. Jargon or vague language wastes everyone’s time.

    Recruiters Read Your Thoughts

    During your job search, maintain an active profile, says Melanie Lundberg, assistant vice president of talent management and corporate communications for Combined Insurance. "Read news feeds, share content, comment—it shows a level of professional engagement," she says.

    Similarly, link to articles you’ve written or other examples of your work. Many will also be looking for professionalism in what you post.

    Those Recommendations Are Nice, But . . .

    Recruiters are mostly unimpressed with recommendations unless they’re short and really highlight something about your capabilities or strengths, O’Malley says. Don’t ditch them, but don’t put too much stock in them, either.

    Saying You’re Job Hunting Helps

    By using the Open Candidates option, you can privately let recruiters know that you’re looking for a job. Svei says it’s a good idea to use this option, which indicates that you want to hear about potential opportunities.


    https://www.fastcompany.com/3067594/...nkedin-profile

  10. #10
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    The Complete List of Industry-Specific Job Boards & Search Engines

    I'm very pleased to announce CareerTuners' newest free resource, our complete list of industry-specific job boards and job search engines.


    Use this list to quickly take your job search to the next level.


    I'm trying to add to this list, so if you know of any websites that I missed or if you see any errors (for example if you see a job search engine that is actually a job board) in this list, please comment below.


    If you feel this is a useful resource, please like or share this article so your LinkedIn connections can benefit from it too.


    Connect with me or follow me on LinkedIn for daily job search tips.

    https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/compl...za-the-job-fob


 

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