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Thread: Windows 7

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    Default Windows 7

    Windows 7 is available in six different editions, but only Home Premium, Professional and Ultimate are widely available at retail. The other editions are focused at other markets, such as the developing world or enterprise use. Each edition of Windows 7 includes all of the capabilities and features of the edition below it. According to Microsoft, thefeatures for all editions of Windows 7 are stored on one CD, regardless of what edition is in use. Users who wish to upgrade to an edition of Windows 7 with more features can then use Windows Anytime Upgrade to purchase the upgrade, and unlock the features of those editions

    Windows 7 Starter
    Windows 7 Starter is the edition of Windows 7 that contains the least features. The Windows Aero theme is not included in this version, and it is not available in a 64-bit variant. The desktop wallpaper, and Visual Style (Windows 7 Basic) is also not user-changeable. This edition is available pre-installed on computers, especially netbooks, through system integrators or computer manufacturers.[10][11][12]

    Windows 7 Home Basic
    Windows 7 Home Basic is available in emerging markets such as Brazil, People's Republic of China, Colombia, India, Pakistan, the Philippines, Mexico, and Thailand.[13] It is not available in countries such as Australia, Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Ireland, Japan, the Netherlands, New Zealand, Saudi Arabia, the United Kingdom and the United States.[13] Some Aero options are excluded along with several new features.[13] Home Basic, along with other editions sold in emerging markets, include geographical activation restriction, which requires users to activate Windows within a certain region or country.[14]

    Windows 7 Home Premium
    This edition contains features aimed at the home market segment, such as Windows Media Center, Windows Aero and touch-screen controls.[15]

    Windows 7 Professional
    This edition is targeted towards enthusiasts and small business users.[16] It includes all the features of Windows 7 Home Premium, and adds the ability to participate in a Windows Server domain.[16] Additional features include operating as a Remote Desktop server, location aware printing, Encrypting File System, Presentation Mode, Software Restriction Policies (but not the extra management features of AppLocker) and Windows XP Mode.[16]

    Windows 7 Enterprise
    This edition targets the enterprise segment of the market and is sold through volume licensing to companies which have a Software Assurance contract with Microsoft.[17] Additional features include support for Multilingual User Interface (MUI) packages, BitLocker Drive Encryption, and UNIX application support.[17] Not available through retail or OEM channels, this edition is distributed through Microsoft Software Assurance (SA).[17] As a result it includes several SA-only benefits, including a license allowing the running of multiple virtual machines, and activation via VLK.[14]

    Windows 7 Ultimate
    Windows 7 Ultimate contains the same features as Windows 7 Enterprise, but unlike the Enterprise edition, it is available to home users on an individual license basis.[18] Windows 7 Home Premium and Windows 7 Professional users are able to upgrade to Windows 7 Ultimate for a fee using Windows Anytime Upgrade if they wish to do so.[7] Unlike Windows Vista Ultimate, the Windows 7 Ultimate edition does not include the Windows Ultimate Extras feature or any exclusive features.[18]

    Source: Wikipedia
    Last edited by islamirama; Dec-8-2014 at 10:11 PM.

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    How To Install Microsoft Windows 7

    Say goodbye to Vista and XP, and let us walk you through the installation of your new operating system, step-by-step.
    October 24, 2009

    Microsoft's long-awaited successor to Vista -- Windows 7 is finally here. The long wait hasn't stopped early adopters all over the world from grabbing the beta, the release candidate and the RTM code. But if you're just getting your hands on the new operating system, and need help with the installation, we'll walk you through it.

    As superior as Windows 7 is to Vista, Windows 7's setup process is closer to Vista's than anything else. The installer uses the same accelerated setup system that Vista introduced, which shaves installation time down to as little as fifteen to twenty minutes depending on the system in question. Many of the same procedures and prompts have also been carried over.

    If you're approaching 7 from the XP side of things -- that is, if you chose to skip Vista entirely -- things may be a bit unfamiliar. To that end we've created this walkthrough, which provides visual details for both upgrades and fresh installs. This way you can get step-by-step guidance whether you're starting anew or upgrading an existing copy of Vista.

    Before you get started, the usual precautions apply. Back up any user data that's on the system; make sure you have any device drivers needed for at least the first phase of installation (mass storage controllers, generally); don't attempt to do this in the middle of a day when you plan on getting other work done.

    When you're ready to begin, simply start clicking through our step-by-step visual guide.



    __________________________________________


    http://www.informationweek.com/galleries/showImage.jhtml?galleryID=379&imageID=1&articleID= 220700452
    Last edited by islamirama; Dec-8-2014 at 10:11 PM.

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    How To Create Bootable Windows 7 USB To Install Windows 7 From USB Flash Drive


    Two ways to do it.
    1. Using Windows 7 DVD/USB Tool
    2. Using cmd prompt

    You need a USB flash drive with a minimum of 4 GB of free space. And also please backup your data from USB first.

    check out attachments...
    Attached Files

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    WinToFlash Turns Your Windows Installation DVD into a USB-Based Installer





    Windows: Want to turn your Windows installation DVD into an installation flash drive? WinToFlash can do that and more.

    WinToFlash can transfer Windows XP, Vista, and 7 onto a flash drive as well as Server 2003 and 2008. WinToFlash can also transfer Windows Preinstallation Environments to flash drive.

    The process is simple and mostly obvious. You tell WinToFlash where the installation files you want to transfer are located and either let the transfer wizard take care of things, or specify settings like what kind of format the flash drive will undergo. In our test using a USB 2.0 generic flash drive it took about 12 minutes to turn a Windows 7 installation DVD into a USB-based installer.

    WinToFlash is freeware, Windows only.

    WinToFlash [via Download Squad]





    ------------------------------------------------------------------


    Make a bootable USB installer for Windows XP, Vista, 7 with WinToFlash






    Making a bootable USB flash drive for Windows Vista and Windows 7 isn't all that tricky, but it's always nice to find an app that simplifies things. Not only does WinToFlash make the process about as easy as it can get, but it can also create Windows XP, Server 2003, and Server 2008 installers.

    The default options make it easy to roll a silent Windows install, or you can flip the custom switch and specify the exact setup parameters you want to use.

    The handy app also has one more trick up its sleeve: moving Windows Preinstall environments. PE discs can be extremely handy for troubleshooting and repairs, and being able to painlessly zap them over to a USB flash drive means not having to burn a new copy every time someone's haggard old optical drive decides to chew up your CD.

    WinToFlash is a free download and is totally portable. It's an excellent tool to add to your USB-related utilities.



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    Thanks

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    Use any version of Windows 7 free for 120 days

    By Woody Leonhard - August 20, 2009

    Thereís an easy way to stretch Windows 7′s 30-day free-trial period to 120 days so you can determine whether Microsoftís new operating system meets your needs.

    Even better ó if you know the secret ó you can try out any version of Win7, from Ultimate to the lowly Basic, using a single install disc.

    Itís fair to say that by now hundreds of thousands, perhaps millions, of copies of Windows 7 sit on DVDs and hard drives all over the world. You might have downloaded a copy of Win7 from the official sites: Microsoft Developer Network, TechNet, or Software Advantage. Perhaps you hooked up your machine to a torrent or a newsgroup site to download the new OS. Or maybe you snagged a copy from your tech-savvy sister-in-law.

    Whichever channel you use, if you donít already have a copy of Windows 7, you can easily put your paws on the installation bits and burn your own install DVD. Just be sure what you downloaded is the real, shipping version of Windows 7. One way to confirm this is to use a set of checksum verification instructions found on Softpedia.

    Getting a copy of Windows 7 is the easy part. The rub ó and the place where Microsoft makes its money ó is the Win7 activation key. Youíre expected to pay for the key, no matter how you obtained the software.

    Microsoft allows anyone to install and use any version of Windows 7 for 30 days without having to enter an activation key. There are no strings attached, and the operating systemís performance is not degraded or defaced during the trial.

    Fortunately for us, the 30-day grace period can be extended up to three additional times ó to a total of 120 days ó using a Microsoft-supplied utility called the Software License Manager (slmgr). This tool conveniently ships with Windows 7.

    How to use slmgr to extend the free-trial period of Windows Vista was first reported by WS editorial director Brian Livingston on Feb. 15, 2007. Because Windows 7 includes slightly different versions than Vista, the procedure has some new wrinkles. Listen up.

    How to extend Win7′s trial to a full four months

    In a nutshell: If you install Windows 7 and donít enter an installation key, the 30-day activation clock starts. To see how many days you have left, click Start, right-click Computer, and choose Properties. At the bottom of the dialog under Windows Activation, youíll see the number of days left in your trial period.

    When that number gets perilously close to zero, you can extend the free period another 30 days via the following steps:

    Step 1: Click Start, All Programs, Accessories. Right-click Command Prompt and choose Run As Administrator. Enter your administrator password.

    Step 2: Type the following command and press Enter:

    slmgr Ėrearm

    Note the space after slmgr and the hyphen in front of rearm.

    Step 3: Restart Windows 7.

    Once the OS restarts, the Properties dialog described above will indicate that Windows 7′s activation grace period has been reset to a full 30 days.

    You can run the -rearm trick a total of three times. If you perform a -rearm at the end of each 30-day period, you end up with 120 days of full, unfettered Windows 7 use without having to supply an activation key in the interim.

    How to install Win7 Ultimate now, pay less later

    When the activation grace period runs out ó whether itís in 30 or 120 days or somewhere in between ó you need to feed Windows 7 an activation key. Thatís when many Windows 7 customers will find themselves in trouble.

    Let me clarify up front that the 32-bit and the 64-bit versions of Windows take the same keys. A key that works for 32-bit Windows 7 Home Premium also works for 64-bit Windows 7 Home Premium. However, different keys are required for Ultimate vs. Pro vs. Home Premium.

    (I assume you wonít want to install the exceedingly limited Windows Home Basic, which is intended primarily for developing countries. And you wonít be installing Windows Home Starter, because you canít buy a key for it. The Starter version is available only when preinstalled on a new netbook.)

    Say, for example, you install a free trial of Windows 7 Ultimate. However, when the time comes to pay the piper, you want to shell out your shekels only for Win7 Home Premium. (Thatís the version most individual users will choose, and itís considerably cheaper than Win7 Ultimate ó which isnít worth spending more for, as I see it.)

    If you installed a trial of Win7 Ultimate without knowing the secret, youíre stuck. The Home Premium key wonít activate an Ultimate PC. Your only option is a complete reinstall of Windows using the version that matches your bought-and-paid-for key ó Home Premium, in this case.

    The best solution is to install in the first place the version you probably want to end up with. If you expect to pay for Windows 7 Home Premium, you should install Windows 7 Home Premium. The same goes for Windows 7 Professional, which is for use in corporate domains.

    Fortunately, thereís an easy way to install either Windows 7 Home Premium or Pro from a Windows 7 Ultimate CD: simply delete a single file. Hard to believe, but true.

    Convert Win7 Ultimate to Pro or Home Premium

    Hereís the crux of the matter: If you put a DVD containing Win7 Ultimate in your PC and run the installer ó either by booting from the disc or running the setup program from inside Windows ó you end up with Win7 Ultimate. No surprises there.

    However, if you first delete a tiny file named ei.cfg before making the installation DVD, the Win7 installer will give you the choices shown in Figure 1.



    Figure 1. Delete or rename ei.cfg before burning a Windows 7 installation DVD, and a menu then allows you to select which version to install.

    In fact, no matter which Win7 installation DVD you have ó Ultimate, Pro, or Premium ó if you delete the ei.cfg file from the disc, youíll be offered the same choices and can install any version of Windows 7.

    At the moment, only a small number of people have received a physical DVD containing Windows 7 Ultimate. Instead, most current Win7 users downloaded an .iso file, which includes everything on the Windows 7 Ultimate DVD: boot settings, file-structure details, etc. You burn the .iso file to a DVD. Then you either boot your PC from the DVD or run the setup program within an older version of Windows to kick the Win7 installer into gear.

    If you have a Windows 7 Ultimate .iso file, itís easy to delete ei.cfg. First, get a 30-day trial version of the gBurner utility, which is available from the programís download page at CNETís Download.com. Then install and run gBurner, open the Windows 7 .iso file, and delete (or rename) sourcesei.cfg. Piece oí cake, although it can take 20 minutes to save the altered .iso file.

    You can then use either gBurner or Alex Feinmanís ISO Recorder program (available from Alexís site) to burn a version of the .iso file without ei.cfg to DVD.

    What if you do have a physical Windows 7 installation DVD, but you donít have an .iso file? In that case, use either gBurner or ISO Recorder to rip the DVD into an .iso file. Then follow the instructions above to delete the ei.cfg file and burn a new DVD.

    Get the right version of Windows 7 going now and you wonít have to reinstall it ó or pay an exorbitant price ó later.


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    Understanding Windows 7's 'GodMode'


    Windows 7's so-called GodMode is actually a shortcut to accessing the operating system's various control settings.

    Although its name suggests perhaps even grander capabilities, Windows enthusiasts are excited over the discovery of a hidden "GodMode" feature that lets users access all of the operating system's control panels from within a single folder.

    By creating a new folder in Windows 7 and renaming it with a certain text string at the end, users are able to have a single place to do everything from changing the look of the mouse pointer to making a new hard-drive partition.

    The trick is also said to work in Windows Vista, although some are warning that although it works fine in 32-bit versions of Vista, it can cause 64-bit versions of that operating system to crash.

    To enter "GodMode," one need only create a new folder and then rename the folder to the following:

    GodMode.{ED7BA470-8E54-465E-825C-99712043E01C}

    Once that is done, the folder's icon will change to resemble a control panel and will contain dozens of control options. I'm not sure it's my idea of playing God, but it is a handy way to get to all kinds of controls.

    I've asked Microsoft for more details on the feature and how it came to be. But so far, Redmond is silent on the topic.


    http://news.cnet.com/8301-13860_3-10...?tag=rtcol;pop



    Windows 7 has lots of 'GodModes' (exclusive)

    Those intrigued by the "GodMode" in Windows 7 may be interested to know that there are many other similar shortcuts hidden within the operating system.

    Intended for developers as a shortcut to various internal settings, such features have been around since Vista and even before, according to the head of Microsoft's Windows division, who tells CNET that the so-called GodMode settings folder uncovered by bloggers is just one of many undocumented developer features included in Windows.

    In an e-mail interview, Steven Sinofsky, Windows division president, said several similar undocumented features provide direct access to all kinds of settings, from choosing a location to managing power settings to identifying biometric sensors.
    As with the all-encompassing GodMode uncovered by bloggers, these other settings can be accessed directly by creating a new folder with any name (GodMode or otherwise) and then including a certain text string. Sinofsky noted more than a dozen strings create particular settings folders, in addition to the overarching GodMode folder option.

    Sinofsky and others say the term GodMode was coined by bloggers; it was not something the company used internally to refer to the settings folders. Although Microsoft maintains many such undocumented developer commands to access such settings, all are replicated by the operating system's Control Panel settings.

    Such undocumented means of accessing various settings have occurred in previous versions of Windows, and the GodMode identified by bloggers was also present in Windows Vista. Some users of the 64-bit version of Vista, however, say invoking the GodMode folder caused their machines to crash. Microsoft says it has yet to reproduce that problem, though several readers have said they have encountered problems.

    It seems that the folks in Redmond have gotten a kick out of all the attention that the Godmode has gotten and have decided to have fun with it. Sinofsky sent a list of other commands that also create special folders (see list below).

    Given the Vista issues, though, I would try these only on a Windows 7 machine, ideally a test machine. To make it work, create a new folder with any name, then a period, then one of the text strings below.

    For example, the first one could be a folder named "thankscnet.{00C6D95F-329C-409a-81D7-C46C66EA7F33}" (use everything inside quotes--but not the quotes themselves).

    Here's the list of strings:

    Default location of PC.{00C6D95F-329C-409a-81D7-C46C66EA7F33}

    Biometrics.{0142e4d0-fb7a-11dc-ba4a-000ffe7ab428}

    Power options.{025A5937-A6BE-4686-A844-36FE4BEC8B6D}

    Icon notifications.{05d7b0f4-2121-4eff-bf6b-ed3f69b894d9}

    Credential Mgr.{1206F5F1-0569-412C-8FEC-3204630DFB70}

    Install from Network.{15eae92e-f17a-4431-9f28-805e482dafd4}

    Default programs.{17cd9488-1228-4b2f-88ce-4298e93e0966}

    Public keys.{1D2680C9-0E2A-469d-B787-065558BC7D43}

    Wireless.{1FA9085F-25A2-489B-85D4-86326EEDCD87}

    Network.{208D2C60-3AEA-1069-A2D7-08002B30309D}

    My Computer.{20D04FE0-3AEA-1069-A2D8-08002B30309D}

    Printers.{2227A280-3AEA-1069-A2DE-08002B30309D}

    Remote Apps.{241D7C96-F8BF-4F85-B01F-E2B043341A4B}

    Firewall.{4026492F-2F69-46B8-B9BF-5654FC07E423}

    Performance.{78F3955E-3B90-4184-BD14-5397C15F1EFC}
    {62D8ED13-C9D0-4CE8-A914-47DD628FB1B0}

    And, as a reminder, to create the Godmode folder itself, use this string:

    Master.{ED7BA470-8E54-465E-825C-99712043E01C}


    http://news.cnet.com/8301-13860_3-10426627-56.html

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    Download Windows 7 ISO With Your KEY

    Through a new website, Microsoft is allowing some of its customers to download Windows 7 installation media in ISO format. But if you're hoping to repair or refresh an OEM installation of Windows 7, you're out of luck.

    February 26, 2015

    A new Microsoft website has just made life a little easier for anyone who's ever purchased a retail copy of Windows 7.

    If your original installation DVD has been damaged or lost, you can now download the installation media in ISO format from the Microsoft Software Recovery site. (Previously, it was possible to download Windows 7 ISO media from Microsoft's online software distribution partner, Digital River, but those links stopped working last year.)

    You'll need a valid retail product key to unlock the download. After entering that key and selecting one of 19 available languages, you click a button that verifies the key you entered. If you pass that verification step, you can download the media. The ISO file can be used to burn a DVD, create a bootable USB flash drive, or install Windows in a virtual machine.

    But before you get too excited, consider the limitations. The ISO download is for full retail copies of Windows 7 only, purchased in a shrink-wrapped box or from an authorized download site (including Microsoft itself). It won't work with Windows 7 OEM System Builder media, which is still available for sale from online merchants.

    And not all retail keys will work. In my testing, the verification step failed and I was unable to download installation media when I used a product key from a Windows 7 upgrade edition purchased at retail. I was also unsuccessful at convincing the site to authorize a download using valid Retail keys obtained from Microsoft subscription services such as TechNet or MSDN.

    If you're hoping that you can use this option to refresh or repair Windows on a PC that came with Windows 7 preinstalled, you're out of luck. Entering the product key from the Windows 7 Certificate of Authenticity attached to a PC in my office produced this error.



    If you need to restore an OEM copy of Windows 7, you'll need to find your original installation media, beg the OEM for a replacement, or locate the compatible media from somewhere else.

    Curiously, a separate Microsoft-hosted site allows you to download ISO files for Windows 8.1 without entering a product key at all.



    Why are the rules for Windows 8.1 more relaxed?

    The obvious difference is that anyone can install Windows 7 without entering a product key, allowing all of the operating system's features to be used for up to 30 days. And using a single command, you can "rearm" that unactivated copy for up to three additional 30-day periods. By contrast, Windows 8.1 requires a valid product key for installation.

    http://www.zdnet.com/article/microsoft-now-allowing-downloads-of-retail-windows-7-copies



    Create a Win 7 theme

    http://windows.microsoft.com/en-us/w...create-a-theme


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    Windows 7 is more than six years old. Most of the cheap upgrade offers that were available when it was fresh and new are long gone.

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    Windows XP was old as well yet it was the most stable OS and therefore it was and is still being used in many corporations. It's not easy for companies to jump to the latest OS software since much of their customized software has been intertwined with it and further customized. Also, many informed consumers also stuck with windows XP and never upgraded to windows Vista. The same can be said about windows 7. It is the latest most stable and agreeable OS and one that will be used for long as it can or as long as it is still in commission and being supported by MS, much like XP was. Many don't plan on going to windows 8, 10 or any later versions as they are all built with backdoor for intelligence agency to have open access to your system, and because some may not like the tablet like touch technology to them.


 

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