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  1. #101
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    Muslim Students Called Terrorists in School

    by Sarah A. Harvard - June 14, 2017


    Since President Donald Trump was elected, civil rights groups have noticed an uptick in schoolchildren quoting the president's own words to bully their peers.

    Forty-two percent of Muslim families reported their children had experiences with anti-Muslim bullying
    , according to a 2017 study from the Institute for Social Policy and Understanding. One in four of these reported incidents came from teachers or other school officials.

    Mic interviewed four Muslim schoolchildren in New York to hear about their experiences in the classroom: Moheeb, 11, Shahrazad, 8, Enan, 10, and Saif, 11. These Muslim kids don't know much about Trump other than the fact he's the president of the United States and wants to ban Muslims. This doesn't bode well for Shahrazad and her family in war-torn Yemen.

    "I have family in Yemen," Shahrazad said. "[They] can't come if Donald Trump makes another ban. When I pray, I ask God to help America and Yemen."



    Trump and members of his administration have often stated that
    "Islam hates us" and that Muslims have a "predisposition" to terrorism. In turn, hate crimes and Islamophobic speech has exponentially increased since Trump began his presidential campaign. Islamophobia also spiked immediately after the Sept. 11 attacks. But these children have no recollection of the tragedy that unfolded in 2001. They weren't even born yet.

    Enan and Shahrazad, for example, don't think of 9/11 other than a date that comes between Sept. 10 and Sept. 12. "I don't know what 9/11 is," Enan said.

    But despite not knowing who Osama bin Laden was or having any relations to al-Qaeda, they are still suffering from the anti-Muslim backlash that erupted about 15 years ago.

    Moheeb is fed up with the bullying from his classmates and the lack of response from his educators. He recounted when two of his classmates, on different occasions, called him a terrorist. In one incident, Moheeb said he told two of his principals and that they didn't really take any action.

    In another incident, Moheeb said he told his teacher that a female classmate called him a terrorist. The teacher then talked to the female classmate, who is of Puerto Rican descent and who Moheeb said he mistakenly called "Mexican," about the name-calling. Then, according to Moheeb, the teacher only sent him to the principal's office.

    Now, Moheeb said, he ignores the bullying.

    "I feel mad, because I don't think [students and teachers] understand how I feel," Moheeb said. "I sometimes ignore [the bullying]. If I cry about it, they'll do [it] more."

    https://mic.com/articles/179866/these-muslim-kids-are-only-in-elementary-school-and-in-the-classroom-theyre-called-terrorists





    Kids Are Quoting Trump To Bully Their Classmates And Teachers Don't Know What To Do About It

    BuzzFeed News reviewed more than 50 reports of school bullying since the election and found that kids nationwide are using Trump's words to taunt their classmates. If the president can say those things, why can't they?

    By Albert Samaha, Mike Hayes, Talal Ansar - June 6, 2017
    [IMG]https://img.buzzfeed.com/buzzfeed-static/static/2017-06/6/10/enhanced/buzzfeed-prod-fastlane-03/longform-original-12941-1496760531-5.jpg?downsize=1600:*&output-format=auto&output-quality=auto[/IMG]

    Donald Trump's campaign and election have added an alarming twist to school bullying, with white students using the president's words and slogans to bully Latino, Middle Eastern, black, Asian, and Jewish classmates. In the first comprehensive review of post-election bullying, BuzzFeed News has confirmed more than 50 incidents, across 26 states, in which a K-12 student invoked Trump's name or message in an apparent effort to harass a classmate during the past school year.

    In the parking lot of a high school in Shakopee, Minnesota, boys in Donald Trump shirts gathered around a black teenage girl and sang a portion of "The Star-Spangled Banner," replacing the closing line with "and the home of the slaves." On a playground at an elementary school in Albuquerque, New Mexico, third-graders surrounded a boy and chanted "Trump! Trump! Trump!"

    On a school bus in San Antonio, Texas, a white eighth-grader said to a Filipino classmate, "You are going to be deported." In a classroom in Brea, California, a white eighth-grader told a black classmate, "Now that Trump won, you're going to have to go back to Africa, where you belong." In the hallway of a high school in San Mateo County, California, a white student told two biracial girls to "go back home to whatever country you're from." In Louisville, Kentucky, a third-grade boy chased a Latina girl around the classroom shouting "Build the wall!" In a stadium parking lot in Jacksonville, Florida, after a high school football game, white students chanted at black students from the opposing school: "Donald Trump! Donald Trump! Donald Trump!"

    The first school year of the Donald Trump presidency left educators struggling to navigate a climate where misogyny, religious intolerance, name-calling, and racial exclusion have become part of mainstream political speech.

    These budding political beliefs among some students carry consequences beyond the schoolyard. Today's high schoolers will be eligible to vote in 2020, and today's fifth-graders will be eligible to vote in 2024. But even if the wave of Trump-related bullying doesn't reflect some widespread political awakening among young people, it indicates a more troubling reality: the extent to which racial and religious intolerance has shaped how kids talk, joke, and bully.

    "It's unacceptable and it reflects a wider climate of hate that we're seeing," Antonio Lopez, an assistant school superintendent in Portland, Oregon, told BuzzFeed News. Lopez in March announced a plan to personally track racist bullying in his district, citing the importance of snubbing out hateful speech as early as possible.

    Lopez said the hate incidents in his district were on his mind when he heard that white supremacist Jeremy Joseph Christian had stabbed three people, two of them fatally, on a Portland train after they intervened to stop his racist rant against two teenage girls, one of them a Muslim wearing a headscarf.

    While there are no quantitative studies examining the election's impact on school bullying, BuzzFeed News conducted the first large-scale nationwide analysis of bullying incidents linked to Trump, reviewing hundreds of reports submitted to the Documenting Hate project, a database of tips about hate crimes and bias incidents set up by ProPublica and shared with other news organizations.

    BuzzFeed News reviewed every alleged incident, from early October to late May. The reports spanned 149 schools. Of those, BuzzFeed News was able to follow up on 54 cases through interviews, public statements from school officials, and local news reports. (BuzzFeed News has not heard back from the people who filed the other 95 tips.)

    For teachers and principals, the first school year of the Trump presidency brought a new test.

    "This is my 21st year in education and I've never seen a situation like this before," said Brent Emmons, principal of Hood River Middle School in Oregon. "It's a delicate tightrope to walk. It's not my role to tell people how to think about political policies, but it is my role to make sure every kid feels safe at the school."

    At a time of thick political and racial tensions, and of heightened worries among people of color, what is a teacher to say when a student asks: Why can the president say it but I can't?


    https://img.buzzfeed.com/buzzfeed-st...6935034-13.jpg


    Teachers, like everybody else in the United States, realized at some point in 2016 that this election was very different.

    Over her 10 years as a middle school English teacher in Spokane Valley, Washington, Amanda Mead liked to shift her curriculum based on current events. She assigned readings from the civil rights era when protests roiled Ferguson in 2014. In 2012 and 2008, her classroom discussions often turned to the presidential election.

    "We'd talk about Bush, Obama, McCain, et cetera, and the kids would just nod their heads," Mead said. "But as the campaign heated up last year, I started to notice a pretty significant change among my kids. They would say things that I have never heard kids in my school district say. Far more vitriolic."

    She caught a group of white students following a Latino student in the hallway, taunting him with chants of "the wall's coming!" and "Trump! Trump! Trump!" She overheard kids repeating insults Trump had aimed at Hillary Clinton.

    For the kids, there was no escaping Trump. His speeches played on television nearly every night. Every adult seemed to be talking about him - at dinner tables, on social media. He was the central figure of the cultural moment, and he talked like a playground bully.

    "It's a daily occurrence that they hear this language," said Dorothy Espelage, an education psychology professor at the University of Florida who has researched school bullying. "They're just parroting back what they hear" - from parents, from Trump, from raucous crowds on televised campaign rallies.

    Emmons, the middle school principal in Oregon, didn't realize how much kids had latched on to Trump's message until dozens of his students chanted "Build that wall!" during a Halloween assembly after two teachers performing in a skit entered the stage wearing masks of Trump and Clinton. A third of the school's students are Latino.

    "That was the first time that I knew it was going to be a problem at my school," Emmons said. "Many of our students felt unsafe and disrespected. These words are hateful and scary for them."

    When Emmons talked to some of the kids who had chanted, he said he found that "some students had no idea what it meant." They were simply joining in with the mob. "It's middle school; it's what you do because you're right next to them," Emmons said. "I really don't believe that 99% of the kids who were chanting it had any malice or hate in their hearts." Kids, like the president, tend to enjoy a good troll.

    Recalling an incident he witnessed in which some white students harassed minority students with the usual lines about walls and deportation, Dylan Henderson, a high school sophomore in Atlanta, said, "Maybe a few of them truly were passionate about those beliefs, but the others seemed to just be doing it to incite a response, to see what will happen."

    To Emmons and other educators, activities and discussions that once seemed innocently enriching had suddenly become fraught. Teachers grappled with how to talk to students about the election - or whether to talk about it at all. One fifth-grade teacher in North Carolina, who requested anonymity, said her school told teachers to avoid discussion about the candidates and focus on the political process when talking about the election. "I don't think anyone has known how to handle it or approach it," the teacher said.

    Parents were similarly caught off guard by the racist bullying, which many had not encountered.

    A week before the election, students at a high school in Florien, Louisiana, held a mock election in the lunchroom. Nearly all of the 200 or so students voted for Trump. When the vote count was read out, some students began asking who had voted for Clinton. One boy, a Latino 10th-grader, raised his hand. "Go back home!" somebody shouted. "Do you have your working papers?" somebody else said. A "build a wall!" chant broke out. "He didn't want to go back to school," said the boy's mother, who requested anonymity. "He said he didn't feel safe." Having lived in the small town all his life, the boy had gone to school with the same classmates since kindergarten. Most of them are white, yet "this was the first time he felt his race was an issue," his mother said. "I had to explain to him that this is how some people see the world."

    In suburban Dallas, one mother said her sixth-grade son came home from school on Election Day and told her that some classmates had taunted him and two friends on the playground that morning: "Heil Hitlary," one boy said; another said, "One million of your lives is worth less than 30,000 deleted emails." After the boy recalled the incident, he asked his mother, "How did they know we're Jewish?"

    The bullying in schools is part of a larger wave of hate speech, vandalism, and violence that has occurred across the country within the past year. In the four months following the election, Jewish cemeteries were defaced in at least three states, and at least three mosques were set on fire. In Kansas and Washington, white men shot brown men because they thought they were Muslim, killing one and wounding two more. In New York City, a white man who fatally stabbed a black man said he was on a mission to kill many more. A BuzzFeed News investigation earlier this year tallied at least 18 hate crimes and bias incidents from November to March in Oregon alone.

    With so many recent examples of racist beliefs leading to violence, the verbal abuse in schools stands out not just as an example of kids testing boundaries, but as a possible window into a disturbing future.

    On Election Day in Silverton, Oregon, around three dozen students gathered in their high school's parking lot, holding Trump signs and waving American flags. When Latino students passed by, teens in the crowd shouted "Pack your bags, you're leaving tomorrow!" and "Tell your family goodbye!"

    At a Philadelphia prep school, four white students posed for a photo while holding pictures of the Confederate flag and Donald Trump. In the weeks after the election, pro-Trump messages, alongside racist pejoratives and symbols, were spray-painted on walls at schools in Newtown, Pennsylvania; Suwanee, Georgia; and Brookline, Massachusetts.

    In Millersburg, Pennsylvania, a Latina high school student broke into tears when more than 30 classmates chanted "Trump!" at her. In York County, Pennsylvania, a group of high school students holding Trump signs marched through the halls; one shouted "white power." In Coppell, Texas, a Latino high school student found on his desk a goodbye card with a note suggesting he would be deported and ending, "Make America Great Again! Adios!"

    On a school bus in a suburb of St. Louis, a white teen said to a black teen, "Are you ready to get back on the boat now that Trump is president?" In a fifth-grade classroom in Greensboro, North Carolina, a Latino boy cried after another student told him, "Donald Trump wants to send you guys away. He doesn't want you here." At a high school volleyball game in Archer City, Texas, and at high school basketball games in Jefferson Township, New Jersey, and San Diego, white students chanted "Build the wall" at Latino students on the other team. In Nebraska, at baseball games against Schuyler High School, which is 80% Latino, opposing students brought Trump signs and shouted taunts about deportation and building a wall.

    The known incidents of Trump-related school harassment form an incomplete list. Missing are the cases that adults never hear about, the ones lost to the closed ecosystem of adolescent social life.

    One Los Angeles County seventh-grader begged his mom not to tell the principal about the anti-Semitic harassment he was getting from a Trump supporter in his class. The bully was a popular kid. "My son didn't want to deal with the social consequences," his mother said. "He was really adamant that we didn't out this boy."

    Another mother, from the San Francisco Bay Area, learned of a post-election bullying incident when her teenage daughter mentioned it in passing. "She didn't want to talk about it," the mother said. "She didn't want to make a big deal. I was upset. I wanted to go to the principal. But she didn't want that." The girl, a 10th-grader, was new at her school and feared making trouble.

    When reports did make it up the chain, many principals and superintendents, including in Archer City and Philadelphia, responded swiftly, with public statements or district-wide emails condemning the bullying - stands that drew praise from parents. In Warrensburg, Missouri, after a white student held a Donald Trump sign at a high school basketball game against a team whose players were mostly black, the superintendent issued an apology, calling the act "inappropriate and insensitive toward our opponents." The school board in Highland Park, Texas, formed a committee to look into the reports of racist harassment after the election. In San Diego County, the school board passed a resolution vowing to maintain a safe climate for students of all races. In a few cases, such as in Silverton, Oregon, and Millersburg, Pennsylvania, students were suspended.

    Often, kids themselves have made efforts to counter hate incidents at their schools. High schoolers in Atlanta started a group aimed at promoting tolerance. Two middle schoolers in Oregon put together a video showing dozens of classmates stating what they "believe in" - "respect" and "equal rights" were among the more popular lines. In New Albany, Ohio, students took to social media to pressure administrators to remove graffiti of racist words and Trump's name at their high school. When the Latino boy from Florien, Louisiana, returned to school the day after the mock election, "his friends banded around him and the other children who were bullied," his mother said.

    But, at a time when the line between political speech and racist hate seems increasingly faint, responses to bullying sometimes brought a backlash.

    After a white third-grade boy chanted "build the wall" at a Latina classmate at a Louisville elementary school, the teacher and principal gathered the class and told them the boy's actions had been racist. Not everybody was pleased with this lecture. "Parents got mad that the school said it was racist," said the mother of another boy in the class.

    Indeed, as some educators learned this past school year, "build the wall" is not an easy phrase to police. It is, after all, a campaign slogan of a major party candidate, chanted by millions of Americans at rallies across the country, and a primary policy objective of the person elected president. How does a teacher explain to a student why the phrase is unacceptable in the classroom without being accused of political partisanship?

    After the chant at the Hood River Middle School Halloween assembly, Principal Emmons put it this way in a letter to students: "This statement makes many of your fellow students feel badly because it has been used by politicians to threaten deportation of immigrants and threaten Americans of Mexican heritage. Many students at our school are from families of recent immigrants and these words are hurtful and scary for them."

    He called a school-wide assembly to address the incident, ordered a school-wide writing assignment about it, and organized a festival on campus that showcased games and food from around the world.

    Several parents complained that the school's response was heavy-handed. They accused the principal of suppressing political speech.
    Recalling those meetings, Emmons said, "We discussed whether a public school has the ability to limit speech that's used in the national arena. Their viewpoint was: If you thought this way, it didn't make you a bad person; that it was just about improved border security."

    The same argument emerged in May when a high school in North Carolina confiscated yearbooks after administrators discovered that one student's senior quote was "Build that wall." A message on the district's Facebook page called the quote "inappropriate." Hundreds of people left comments, mostly criticizing the decision:

    "This is a violation of the student's rights!!!"
    "What is so 'racist' about the quote?"
    "Quoting the POTUS is never inappropriate!"

    For some families, the end of the school year brings hard choices. One mother from a suburb outside Richmond, Virginia, said that she and her husband, both US citizens born in Mexico, sent their son and daughter to a local Catholic school "thinking we'll have the same values as the families there." Things were smooth for years, until November, when their son was 12 and their daughter 14. "After Trump won, we tried to tell our kids not to worry, but then we started hearing a lot of hate," she said. A classmate at the school, which is predominantly white, called her son a "Mexican churro." When her son scored a goal at a soccer game at recess, another classmate said, "Don't worry, he's going to be deported pretty soon." There were frequent "build the wall" jokes. She informed the principal and the parish priest, she said, but they took no action. When she went to the mother of one of the boys who had targeted her son, the woman defended the comments, saying that the boy was merely "expressing his political point of view." The mother and father are now considering transferring their kids to a public school.

    https://www.buzzfeed.com/albertsamah...eir-classmates


  2. #102
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    High School Journalists Land a Scoop, and the Principal Resigns

    By CHRISTOPHER MELEAPRIL 5, 2017

    Four days after students at a high school newspaper in Kansas published an article that questioned the credentials of a recently hired principal, she resigned.


    The episode, which unfolded at Pittsburg High School in Pittsburg, Kan., about 125 miles south of Kansas City, garnered news coverage and won praise from journalism organizations for investigative reporting by student journalists.

    The story began to germinate on March 6, when the Pittsburg Community Schools announced it had hired Amy Robertson as the high school principal.

    In a statement, it said her “diverse and extensive experience impressed district staff and leadership and repeatedly propelled her to the top” of the list of candidates. She had “decades of experience in education” and was the chief executive of a consulting firm that advised companies on education, the statement said.

    Maddie Baden, a 17-year-old junior and a staff member of the student-run newspaper The Booster Redux, set out to write a profile. Emily Smith, a teacher and adviser to The Redux, said on Wednesday that she had not expected the reporting to lead to questions about Ms. Robertston’s credentials.

    “We’re Midwesterners,” she said. “As soon as somebody puts something on paper, we think they’re honest about what they’re saying.”

    But in multiple interviews over several days, Ms. Robertson provided details of her background that did not hold up, Ms. Smith said.

    Then Ms. Robertson became increasingly evasive.

    “She was asked direct questions,” Ms. Smith said. “She couldn’t give direct answers.”

    Ms. Smith coached the students to press for clearer responses, pushing them to be more assertive with an adult in authority than they were accustomed.

    The students questioned the legitimacy of Corllins University, an institution where Ms. Robertson said she got her master’s and doctorate degrees. It lists no physical address on its website and has been the subject of consumer complaints and warnings about its lack of accreditation. Her profile on LinkedIn, the professional networking site, did not identify where she had earned her master’s degree and Ph.D., listing only “N/A.”

    Smaller details also aroused the students’ curiosity. For instance, Ms. Robertson said she had earned a bachelor’s of fine arts degree from the University of Tulsa, but when the students checked, they learned it does not confer that kind of degree, Ms. Smith said.

    The students and Ms. Smith met with the school superintendent, Destry Brown, about their concerns, and he was “supportive and open,” she said. They kept reporting and “continued to write up to five minutes before it went to print,” she said.

    On Friday, The Redux, a monthly broadsheet published 10 times a year, hit the newsstands with a front-page story, headlined “District Hires New Principal” and with the subheading, “Background called into question after discrepancies arise.”

    On Tuesday night, the board of education met and announced that Ms. Robertson had resigned. “In light of the issues that arose” she felt it was in the district’s best interest, a board statement said.

    Ms. Robertson, who was to assume the $93,000-a-year position starting on July 1, could not be immediately reached for comment on Wednesday.

    Ms. Robertson, who lived in Dubai, United Arab Emirates, was the principal of the Dubai American Scientific School, and recently had her license temporarily suspended by education authorities there
    , The Gulf News reported. Immigration issues prevented her from getting needed permits, The News reported.

    Mr. Brown praised the students for their persistence but acknowledged he felt a twinge of disappointment about how it unfolded. He said Ms. Robertson’s hiring was contingent on passing a background check and producing needed documentation. He said the details would have come out eventually, but the students’ work sped thing up.

    “I believe strongly in our kids questioning things and not believing things just because an adult told them,” he said. “I have a little bit of heartburn over the whole article. I wasn’t going to stop that because I believe in that whole First Amendment thing.”

    Journalism groups were also full of praise.

    Tom Rosenstiel, executive director of the American Press Institute, a journalism research and training group, said his organization has seen outstanding work from college students working with professional journalists on investigations but said that what the high school students did “really stands out.”

    At a time of shrinking resources in newsrooms, students are helping to fill gaps in coverage, he said, adding, “There’s a sense that significant journalistic investigations can come from anywhere now.”

    Student journalists are routinely underestimated by those in positions of authority
    , Frank LoMonte, executive director of the Student Press Law Center, said on Wednesday. The students consulted with him about their reporting on the article.

    The article might never have appeared had it not been for the Kansas Student Publications Act, which grants students independent control over their editorial content, including material that might paint a school in an unflattering light, he said. A 1988 Supreme Court ruling gave administrators the authority to censor the content of student journalists.

    Ten states, including Kansas, passed laws giving students independent control
    , although administrators can still remove material that is obscene, defamatory or poses a danger to the school. Similar bills are pending in nine other states, Mr. LoMonte said.

    “If that same situation happened in Texas, New York or Florida, that story would not have seen the light of day,”
    he said.

    He credited school administrators for taking a hands-off approach and letting the students pursue the reporting.

    “I hope it really emboldens young people to take on substantive news stories even if they are afraid of administrative censorship,” he said. “This story proves you can make positive changes in your community through journalism.”

    https://www.nytimes.com/2017/04/05/u...pal-quits.html

    comments:

    This what these people do. They either can't get hired (or got fired) some crime they did or lack of education and experience in their western country and so they go in the East and lie to get a lucrative high position. After working there for a few years and earning a lot money they come back to their country with fake credentials to do the same.

    She is not the first unqualified principal in the west to get caught in this deceit. In 2012, a principal in Melbourne Australia was fired from a prestigious school after making up false previous experiences. He was caught after he couldn't perform the duties of a principal, which led to a thorough look at his previous "principal" positions (that he never had).

  3. #103
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    Daniel Haqiqatjou – Missionaries in Western Schools


    "If I told you that Christian missionaries were going to your child's school and aggressively proselytizing to them and pressuring them to leave Islam and become Christians, wouldn't you be alarmed? Wouldn't you be angry and concerned?

    What if I told you these missionaries weren't at your child's school one day but were there every single day, just constantly pressuring your kid to accept Christianity and leave his Islamic faith behind. Would you keep your child at that school?

    The reality is, virtually all schools in the Western world (and many in the Muslim world as well) are indoctrinating your children, but the religion being imposed is not Christianity. It is secular liberal materialism.

    If you have ever wondered why our youth are leaving Islam in droves, there is a clear reason for it. It's not some freak phenomenon that no one can control. It has a clear cause. We have to do something, anything, to protect our kids and counteract any damage that has already been done."

    ~ Daniel Haqiqatjou

    Daniel Haqiqatjou – Missionaries in Western Schools

  4. #104
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    Cambridge headteacher guilty of trying to meet teenage boy he groomed

    Parents in shock after Glyn Knowles, who was acting head of private Cambridge International School, was arrested in Bishop's Stortford while trying to meet the 'teenage boy'



    • 18 JUL 2017


    A Cambridge headteacher who was a child protection officer for his school has pleaded guilty to grooming a young boy and attempting to meet him - but was caught by police.

    Glyn Knowles, who was acting head of private Cambridge International School
    which has campuses in Cherry Hinton, Abington and in Bateman Street, Cambridge, has been sacked immediately and the school has broken the “incredibly shocking news” to parents.

    Knowles’ victim had no connection to the school.

    The 50-year-old of High Street, Puckeridge, Hertfordshire, appeared before Hatfield Remand Court, based at Hatfield Police Station, on Monday, July 17 where he pleaded guilty to attempting to meet a boy under 16 years of age following grooming (section 15 of the Sexual Offences Act 2003).

    Police were called to Bishop’s Stortford at 2.30pm on July 14 to reports a man was attempting to meet a person he believed to be a teenage boy.

    Knowles was stopped in a vehicle on The Causeway and arrested.

    Parents have reacted with shock.

    One parent, who asked not to be named, said: “It needs to be out there because other people need to know about this guy.

    “It’s completely shocking news and I just want everybody to know about it. The most bizarre thing is that he’s the child protection officer for the school.”

    Cambridge International School is for children aged 3-16 and students come from 32 countries and speak 27 different languages. [and people want to send their kids to these so called "elite" western schools, leaving them at the mercy of these pedos]

    In a letter to parents, Nick Rugg, of the International School Partnership which manages the school, said: “I am writing to you further to the release of information regarding Mr Glyn Knowles which has come to our attention over the weekend.

    “Based on this information, I wanted to get in touch to let you know that, with immediate effect, Mr Knowles has been dismissed from Cambridge International School.

    "Mr Knowles has pleaded guilty to a charge of attempting to meet a boy under the age of 16 years of age following grooming (section 15 of the Sexual Offences Act 2003). I can confirm there is no link to any CIS student.

    “The safeguarding and well-being of children at CIS is of paramount importance to the school and the International Schools Partnership and all our staff are vetted through the Disclosure and Barring Service as per the school’s safeguarding policy.

    “We are assisting police in their investigation in any way we can. Should you wish to disclose anything directly to Hertfordshire Constabulary, please contact DS Hartley, the lead investigator, on 01707 355383.

    “We know this will come as an incredible shock to you, as it has to us, and we are here to support you with any questions and concerns you may have.”

    Knowles was the ‘Designated Safeguarding Lead and Prevent Strategy Lead’ at the school
    , according to its website.

    He was acting principal and said on his staff profile he was “born and raised in Liverpool where I attended the Holt School”.

    Knowles also said he spent some time working for the National Trust as a species protection officer and in mountain rescue.

    He was also a diving instructed with Indepth diving based in the Hertford area which holds teaching sessions in Hartham Leisure Centre in the county town and at Haileybury independent boarding and day school and holds classes in Brickendon Parish Hall.

    The dive school declined to comment but said Knowles had not been with them for more than a year.

    Knowles wrote on the dive school’s website: “First experience of open water was at Wraysbury in 2004.

    “Since then I have dived in Oz, NZ, Malta, Grand Canaria, Egypt, Iceland and of course the UK. Love it all!

    “Qualified as a SSI Open Water Instructor, offering speciality training in Photography, Navigation, Dry suit, Stress & Rescue and Nitrox.

    “Also provide training in EFR and Emergency Oxygen Provision.”

    It is believed Knowles was also a member of an archery club in the Hertford area.

    A Hertfordshire police spokeswoman said: “Glyn Knowles, who is 50 years old and from High Street, Puckeridge (Herts) appeared before Hatfield Remand Court on Monday, July 15 where he pleaded guilty to attempting to meet a boy under 16 years of age following grooming (section 15 of the Sexual Offences Act 2003).

    “Officers had been called to Bishop’s Stortford at 2.30pm on July 14 to reports a man was attempting to meet a person he believed to be a teenage boy. Glyn Knowles was stopped in a vehicle on The Causeway and arrested.

    “He will be sentenced on August 18, 2017 at St Albans Crown Court.”

    http://www.cambridge-news.co.uk/news...-meet-13348944

  5. #105
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    Transgender reveal in kindergarten class leaves parents feeling "betrayed"


    The Rocklin Academy school board is facing tough questions from parents concerned over a controversial incident involving transgender discussions inside a kindergarten class, CBS Sacramento reports.

    "These parents feel betrayed by the school district that they were not notified,
    " said Karen England with the Capitol Resource Institute.

    The incident happened earlier this summer during the last few days of the academic school year.

    At Monday night's board meeting, the teacher at the center of the controversy spoke out. With emotions high, she addressed a packed house.

    "I'm so proud of my students, it was never my intent to harm any students but to help them through a difficult situation," she said.

    The teacher defended her decision to read two children's books about transgenderism
    including one titled "I am Jazz." She says the books were given to her by a transgender child going through a transition.

    "The kindergartners came home very confused, about whether or not you can pick your gender, whether or not they really were a boy or a girl," said England.

    Parents say besides the books, the transgender student at some point during class also changed clothes and was revealed as her true gender.

    And many parents say they feel betrayed and blindsided.

    "I want her to hear from me as a parent what her gender identity means to her and our family, not from a book that may be controversial," a parent said.

    "My daughter came home crying and shaking so afraid she could turn into a boy,"
    another parent said.

    The issue was not on the agenda, so parents spoke out during public comment.

    "It's really about the parents being informed and involved and giving us the choice and rights of what's being introduced to our kids, and at what age
    ," said parent Chelsea McQuistan.

    Many teachers also spoke out in support of what transpired inside the classroom. They spoke about the importance of teaching students about diversity and having healthy dialogues.

    One parent said the impact on her son was extremely positive.

    "It was so precious to see that he had absolutely no prejudice in his body. My child just went in there and listened to the story, and didn't relate it to anything malicious, or didn't question his own body," she said.

    "When we head in the direction of banned books or book lists, or selective literature – that should only be read inside or outside the classroom, I think that's a very dangerous direction to go," said 7th grade teacher Kelly Bryson.

    The district says the books were age-appropriate and fell within their literature selection policy.

    Unlike sex education, the topics of gender identity don't require prior parental notice.

    In a statement during the board meeting, the district said: "As indicated by Superintendent Robin Stout in a communication last week, staff will be engaging parents and teachers in discussions about how materials outside our curriculum will be addressed in the future."

    The large discussion has compelled the board to put the item on the next month's agenda.


    https://www.cbsnews.com/news/transge...parents-upset/


    Comments:

    This is the education system of today where the teachers can teach whatever they want to your kids with other teachers defending their own as well as board policies saying it's 'ok' and parents don't have to be informed. Young fragile kids are left in their hands to damage and brain wash as they please.

  6. #106
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    Islamophobic Bullying in Our Schools

    “You boys were so much fun on the 8th grade trip! Thanks for not bombing anything while we were there!” read the yearbook inscription penned by the middle school teacher.

    The eighth grade yearbook was littered with similar remarks by classmates linking Omar to a “bomb.”

    “To my bomb man!” read one note. “Come wire my bomb,” read another.

    “What is this?” asked Omar’s mother incredulously. He had handed the yearbook over to her moments earlier when he arrived home that afternoon.

    Omar answered quietly, “I know, Mom, I know.” He stared down at the kitchen floor. His eyes could not meet his mother’s but he began to tell her what had happened just one month earlier.

    In May 2009, Omar joined his classmates on a school trip to Washington, D.C. As they toured the Washington Monument, visited area museums and passed by the White House, the kids repeatedly told Omar they hoped he wouldn’t “bomb” any of the sites. A teacher chaperoned the children, heard the comments and responded by doing... well, nothing, except leave a denigrating remark in Omar’s yearbook a month later.

    It was clear to Omar’s mother that her American born and raised son was harassed because of his Muslim faith and Arab ancestry.

    Unfortunately, this was not the first bias-based bullying incident involving Omar that school year. Only several months earlier a peer was intimidating Omar, calling him a “terrorist,” during an elective trade course. Omar finally told his mother about the bullying when his report card indicated that he was failing that same class, while acing the others where he was not subjected to such humiliating treatment.

    Omar’s mother had addressed the bullying with the school Vice-Principal immediately afterwards.

    But, when she spoke to her son’s school Principal regarding the D.C. trip and subsequent offensive yearbook comments (by a school teacher), the Principal was shocked to learn that Omar had been a prior victim of bullying earlier in the academic year. He had no knowledge of that incident in his school.

    While the Principal assured her that he would take proper action against the offending teacher, nothing actually happened. The teacher denied hearing the bomb-related comments during the field trip to D.C. and excused her yearbook note as a “joke.”

    Omar’s incensed mother took her case to the school Superintendent who in turn suggested scheduling a cultural sensitivity training about Arabs and Muslims for faculty.

    That never came to pass, however.

    In a written complaint Omar’s mother filed with a state government agency (with jurisdiction over such bias-based bullying incidents as the one involving her son) she observed:

    “[O]ne day, there will be a child who is pushed beyond their limits, as we have seen in tragic events throughout the country, like Columbine and suicides of children being picked on for no other reason than being “different.”
    What will we do then?
    Must we wait for tragedy to create a safer and more open society for our community?”
    By now Omar was a freshman in the public high school where the bullying continued, unabated.

    In school, Omar was frequently referred to as “faggot.”

    Omar never told his parents.

    The verbal harassment culminated into physical “touching.”

    A male student rubbed Omar’s shoulder while calling him “faggot.”

    Still, Omar said and did nothing seeming paralyzed by his fear and shame.

    Then, during a fire drill at school a group of boys yelled out to Omar, “Call off your tribe so we can go back into school!”

    That was it.

    Omar told his parents what was happening. He explained to his mother that he tried to keep the bullying a secret because he did not want to “hurt or upset” them.

    Omar’s mother complained to the Principal, Superintendent and state agency... again.

    This time, the high school held a cultural sensitivity training focusing on American Arabs and Muslims and geared towards faculty members, only.

    Some mistakenly believe that bullying is a rite of passage which children must endure. It is worth noting the American Medical Association, the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention identify school bullying as a “public health problem.”

    In fact, bullying has been recognized as a form of child abuse when perpetrated by other children. Studies have shown that victims of bullying may suffer school phobia, increased truancy and reduced concentration and classroom achievement. Bullying victims may also suffer sleep disturbances, bedwetting, abdominal pain, high levels of anxiety and depression, loneliness, low self-esteem and heightened fear for personal safety.

    While anti-bullying legislation plays a critical role in protecting bullying victims, proper implementation and enforcement of those laws is key. Case in point: over 45 states have such legislation in effect (including Omar’s home state) yet bullying — and bias-based bullying — persists in epidemic proportions.

    And, what happens when a disappointing report card or offensive inscriptions in a child’s yearbook does not tip off a parent that his or her child is a target of such bullying conduct? Many children refrain from sharing such details with family members sometimes out of a sense of shame and embarrassment but often because they are attempting to shield parents from being hurt or upset, as we saw in Omar’s case above.

    Preventative measures geared at faculty, students and administrators are necessary to stop bullying from occurring in the first instance. Indeed, evidence suggests that bullying behavior can be significantly reduced through prevention curricula.

    According to a new report published by the Institute for Social Policy and Understanding (ISPU) titled, “Global Battleground or School Playground: The Bullying of America’s Muslim Children,” bias-based bullying against American Muslim children (or those perceived to be Muslim) is on the rise and such school bullying is largely attributed to cultural and religious misunderstanding.

    The report finds that a primary factor underlying the persistent harassment, ridicule and discrimination against American Muslim children is the American mainstream’s general misperception of Islam and Muslims.

    The ISPU paper calls for intensive and pervasive efforts to educate American society about Islam and Muslims. It suggests that such cultural information should be provided to libraries, knowledge bases, teachers and school administrators.

    Such facts and figures about Muslims and Islam — compiled with the assistance of diverse community groups and advocates — should also be featured in educational materials and resources, school curricula, popular Internet sites, television and films.

    Not surprisingly the report identifies the media as a problem source for stereotyped images of Muslims as terrorists and the outside group in the “us” versus “them” dichotomy.

    Perhaps it is time for “Hollywood” to consider positive associations for the Muslims it portrays on the big screen and in our family rooms. American Muslims are doctors, lawyers, engineers, make-up artists, photographers, engineers, information technology specialists, law enforcement agents, teachers, professors, bankers, community advocates, humanitarians, etc. — isn’t it time we portray them that way?

    Children’s programming can also play a critical role in addressing this issue.

    Note the influence of Sesame Street, for instance: a 1996 survey found that 95 percent of all American preschoolers had watched Sesame Street by the time they were three. More recently, in 2008, an estimated 77 million Americans had watched the program as kids.

    In my view, Sesame Street should feature more American Muslim, Arab American and South Asian celebrities, children and characters in its regular programing.

    The children’s show has made great strides in promoting diversity and multiculturalism and recently introduced its first South Asian character to the regular cast. To further promote increased diversity, it could throw a party with authentic Middle Eastern food and music for its American viewing audience, for example.

    Musicians could play the tabla — an Arabic percussion instrument which produces a great beat — while guests enjoy pita chips and hummus. Mangos, a popular fruit in the Arab and Muslim world, could also make an appearance where celebrating children learn how to count all the mangos.

    And, during ‘The Word on the Street’ segment, Murray could imaginably interview a young Sikh man with a turban or a young American Muslim girl or woman who wears a hijab or headscarf. This may help address the growing phenomenon of “hijabophobia.”

    Further, The Daily Show‘s Asif Mandvi, who happens to be an Indian-American Muslim in addition to being funny, could make a cameo appearance to help define and explain a new word (e.g. the word jocular) to the young viewing audience. I am willing to offer my consulting services free of charge to help realize progress in this way.

    The answer does not lie with Sesame Street alone, however. Countless other children’s programming could help as well and impact continued positive change. For instance, in addition to Dora, Diego and Ni Hao, Kai-lan, perhaps Nickelodeon could consider adding similar programming with Arab, Muslim and South Asian heroes and heroines.

    You may be wondering about Omar and his family. His mother organized and conducted cultural competency training on American Muslims and Arab Americans for her son’s school district. It was well-received.

    As for Omar — with the help of his family he has a great new attitude towards bullying which prompts him to stick up for other children targeted in the way he was.

    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/engy-a...b_1002293.html

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    ‘And now we say, ‘Heil Hitler’’: A teacher had her students give the Nazi salute


    A substitute teacher in Georgia, Vermont, has been fired after she taught her students the Nazi salute and had them demonstrate it with her, according to local media reports.

    The teacher, who was not identified, was filling in as a long-term substitute for a third-grade class at Georgia Elementary & Middle School, per NBC5.

    According to Seven Days, the incident took place Thursday as students were returning from the cafeteria to their classroom. School officials say the children were walking with their arms raised in the traditional Nazi salute, with their teacher demonstrating the post alongside them.

    A parent in the parking lot witnessed the group and said the teacher “then raised her arm slightly and said, ‘and now we say, Heil Hitler,’” per the Milton Independent.

    The parent reported the incident to school officials, who confronted the substitute. The woman reportedly admitted to making the gesture and remark, per NBC5. She was fired Thursday night.

    According to the Independent, the teacher had been subbing at the school for eight years without incident.

    Nazi salutes have landed other people and educators in trouble recently as well, as CNN fired commentator Jeffrey Lord for tweeting the phrase “Sieg Heil,” a traditional Nazi phrase used with a salute. High school students in Albany, California, and Cypress, Texas, posed while making the salute in February and March as well.

    The U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum recommends that students begin learning about the historical events of the Holocaust in fourth grade.

    http://www.sacbee.com/news/nation-wo...175059396.html

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    Modern Librarians and their sense of "acceptable" literature

    Elementary school librarian REJECTS First Lady Melania Trump's donation of Dr Seuss books because they are 'tired and cliche'



    • School librarian rejects books donated by First Lady Melania Trump
    • Donation was part of White House initiative dubbed 'National Read a Book Day'
    • Along with the donation came a letter from Melania Trump, which emphasized the importance of education and reading
    • Cambridgeport Elementary School librarian Liz Phipps Soeiro claimed in an open letter that the school did not need the books
    • She called Dr. Seuss cliché, tired and a worn ambassador for children's literature
    • The school district later distanced themselves from Soeiro, saying her opinions do not reflect that of the school system


    A librarian at a Massachusetts elementary school has declined nearly a dozen books donated by Melania Trump, calling them 'tired' and 'cliche.'

    But Cambridgeport Elementary School librarian Liz Phipps Soeiro, whose school represents Massachusetts in the initiative, said on Thursday that her award winning library wasn't in need of the literature.

    'My students have access to a school library with over nine thousand volumes and a librarian with a graduate degree in library science,' Phipps Soeiro wrote in an open letter on the Horn Book blog website.

    'You may not be aware of this, but Dr. Seuss is a bit of a cliché, a tired and worn ambassador for children's literature. As First Lady of the United States, you have an incredible platform with world-class resources at your fingertips,' she wrote.

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/arti...iven-Lady.html

    Comments:


    What does this dumb cow suggest, "Today I'm Billy, Tomorrow I'm Sue"? My family sticks with traditional children's books and values, like saying thank you after receiving a gift. - MaggiePie

    Another good reason for home schooling.,I would say - Guitarman

    By the looks, she's well aware of tired and cliche. I've never met a child who didn't enjoy a bit of Seuss now and then. Glad she isn't our librarian. - SassySusie


 

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