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    Default Rising Number of Kids Exposed to Online Porn

    Study: Rising Number of Kids Exposed to Online Porn

    February 05, 2007

    CHICAGO — More children and teens are being exposed to online pornography, mostly by accidentally viewing sexually explicit Web sites while surfing the Internet, researchers say.

    Forty-two percent of Internet users aged 10 to 17 surveyed said they had seen online pornography in a recent 12-month span.

    Of those, 66 percent said they did not want to view the images and had not sought them out, University of New Hampshire researchers found. Their conclusions appear in February's Pediatrics, due out Monday.

    "It's beyond the wild West out there. You've really taken away the age of innocence," said Dr. Michael Wasserman, a pediatrician with the Ochsner Clinic in Metairie, La., who was not involved in the study.

    Online pornography was defined in the study as images of naked people or people having sex.

    "It's so common now, who hasn't seen something like that?" said Emily Duhovny, 17.

    The Marlboro, N.J., high school senior said X-rated images pop up all the time when she's online. Duhovny said the first time she saw one, it was shocking, but now, "more than anything, it's just annoying."

    "It doesn't have to be a negative thing, but that shouldn't be how you learn about sex education," said Duhovny, an editor for Sexetc.org, a teen-written Web site on sexual health issues affiliated with Rutgers University.

    In the survey, conducted between March and June 2005, most kids who reported unwanted exposure were aged 13 to 17. Still, sizable numbers of 10- and 11-year-olds also had unwanted exposure — 17 percent of boys and 16 percent of girls that age.

    More than one-third of 16- and 17-year-old boys surveyed said they had intentionally visited X-rated sites in the past year. Among girls the same age, 8 percent had done so.

    The results come from a telephone survey of 1,500 Internet users aged 10 to 17, conducted with their parents' consent.

    Overall, 34 percent had unwanted exposure to online pornography, including some children who had willingly viewed pornography in other instances. The 2005 number was up from 25 percent in a similar survey conducted in 1999 and 2000.

    The latest survey has a margin of error of plus or minus 2.5 percentage points.

    Online use that put kids at the highest risk for unwanted exposure to pornography was using file-sharing programs to download images. However, they also stumbled onto X-rated images through other "normal" Internet use, the researchers said, including talking online with friends, visiting chat rooms and playing games.

    Filtering and blocking software helped prevent exposure, but was not 100 percent effective, the researchers said.

    Better methods are needed "to restrict the use of aggressive and deceptive tactics to market pornography online" without also hampering access to legitimate sites, the researchers said.

    University of Chicago psychiatrist Sharon Hirsch said exposure to online pornography could lead kids to become sexually active too soon, or could put them at risk for being victimized by sexual predators if they visit sites that prey on children.

    "They're seeing things that they're really not emotionally prepared to see yet, which can cause trauma to them," Hirsch said.

    Exposure also could skew their perceptions about what constitutes a healthy sexual relationship, said Janis Wolak, the study's lead author and a researcher at the University of New Hampshire's Crimes Against Children Research Center.

    Still, many survey participants said they were not disturbed by what they saw, and Wolak said research is needed to determine how exposure to online pornography affects kids.



  2. #2
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    Ulanoff: Parents Need to Know What Kids Are Doing Online

    May 24, 2007



    The other day I took my two kids — my 12-year-old son and 8-year-old daughter — to Times Square in Manhattan. I kissed them both on the cheek, told them to have fun and be careful, and then left them there — all day.

    Okay, I didn't really do this, but millions of parents around the country are essentially doing the same thing when they leave their children to their own devices while on the Internet.

    Here's the common scenario:

    A child anywhere from 6 to 16 campaigns for a new PC for his or her bedroom. Parents hem and haw and complain about expense, but, in the end, they give in and buy a value PC that can handle basic tasks — e-mail, word processing and Web browsing.

    Once the new PC is set up and running, a second conversation ensues.

    Child: "I need Internet access."
    Mom: "We have it on your dad's PC. Use that."
    Child: "I don't wanna. I need it on this one, so I can work on my book reports and, like, find stuff for current events. And all my friends are talking on AIM."
    Mom: "So?"
    Child: "Mom, I don't want kids to think I'm weird. I need to be on."
    Mom: "How often?"
    Child: "Not too much, I promise."

    Life is full of such little lies. Of course, Mom gives in and Junior gets Internet access in his bedroom.

    Within minutes, he's signing up for a free AIM handle — usually through his parents' AOL Internet access (Side note: Why is anyone still paying for this?).

    The child goes online and now he's, for all intents and purposes, all alone in the "big city."

    No one is watching him. No one is protecting him. And no one is making sure this kid follows basic online rules of conduct.

    In fact, as far as the kid knows, there are none. He's left alone to run into trouble and create trouble.

    Many kids discover the Internet's lack of rules and regulations early on. They create impossible-to-decipher screen names and then, once they've learned the screen names for their friends, wreak a little havoc. Sometimes they even claim to be other people.

    Outside of instant messaging, they're setting up MySpace pages, visiting Web sites found through Google, and essentially walking down every dark Internet alleyway none the wiser.

    Such freedom! Isn't this sprawling Internet metropolis wonderful?

    Such recklessness.

    New AIM accounts are almost always trolled by AIM predators and bots.

    The predators hope to stumble on fresh meat to manipulate. Bots are there to test your security defenses — if they're weak, the kid and his PC are in trouble.

    While all this is going on in the bedroom, the clueless parent is in the kitchen, making dinner, cleaning up and caring for the family. What they really should be caring about is what's going on in that bedroom on that PC.

    My child's grade school has held talks at various PTA meetings, educating parents on the various online dangers. They instruct parents about the proper placement of an Internet-connected PC. Of course, the parents who really need to hear this are typically not in attendance.

    So how do we warn parents about the dangers of putting an Internet-connected system in a child's bedroom? How do we make them understand that this can be a dangerous mistake?

    Circuit City, Best Buy, Dell, Gateway, and others often advertise how they're here to help us: Their great products can help us achieve our goals and even connect with our friends, family, and workplace in more meaningful ways.

    What if there was a new kind of document included with each system shipped by Dell and others?

    Let's call it The Parents' Good Sense Technology Guide. It could list some key points every parent should keep in mind, with topic headers such as these:

    — System Placement: The Family PC Room
    — Security: Hardware, Software, and Common Sense
    — Personal Information: It's Not for Sharing
    — The Dangers Your Family Faces and How to Avoid Them: You Can Have the Biggest Impact

    This will never happen because manufacturers would worry that scared consumers would pack up the PCs and send them back.

    So, friends, it's up to all of you to spread the word. I know friends, relatives, and coworkers often call you, asking for tech advice. Why not start sharing your own Parents Good Sense Technology Guide?


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    Swedish girls suffer widespread harassment: report
    20 Sep 09

    Every third young Swede has been subjected to repeated harassment, threats or violence over the past year. Six percent of young girls have been raped, a new report from Swedish researchers shows.

    There are large differences between how girls and boys are affected from violence in society.

    "Girls are more exposed to sexual violence, while boys are more exposed to physical violence," Helena Blom, one of the researchers in Sundsvall in northern Sweden told Sveriges Radio's Ekot news programme.

    Over 2,000 young girls and almost 1,000 young men who paid a visit to one of nine selected youth clinics in the spring of 2007 were included in the study.

    The young people were given a series of questions to respond to describing their experiences of violence and grade the level of severity.

    The survey showed that six percent of girls had experienced the most serious sexual offence - rape.

    The research has been conducted in collaboration with Umeå University and the National Centre for Knowledge on Men's Violence Against Women (NCK).

    http://www.thelocal.se/22184/20090920/

    Comments:

    If this research is done in other countries, similar results would be found. It has become very important to teach kids how to defend themselves these days, there should be no excuses what so ever!

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    Girl, 14, gang raped on internet date
    20 Aug 09

    A 14-year-old girl was raped on Wednesday evening by at least two people in a bush by Grönkullagatan in Helsingborg.

    The girl, who comes from outside of the city, had arranged on the internet to meet a boy.

    But when she and a 14-year-old friend came to Helsingborg to meet the boy they were instead met by a gang of five men, all around 18-years-old.

    According to initial reports the 14-year-old was raped by at least two of the men. Her friend witnessed the attack and called the police.

    The police, with the help of dogs, managed to trace and locate the gang of men a short distance from the scene of the crime. The five men have been taken in for questioning and are all suspected of rape.

    "We have secured samples and when the analysis is complete the various roles played by the men will become clear," Peter Martin at Skåne police told the TT news agency.

    comment:

    How many examples must people see before they realize why they need to watch their kids, and not let them be alone on the internet!

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    Sex on TV Increases Teen Pregnancy, Says Report

    By Alice Park Monday, Nov. 03, 2008

    Sex on TV has come a long way in the past few years. Anyone who saw the first episode of 90210a pair of students engage in oral sex in the first episode of the new sequel to Beverly Hills 90210 — can attest to that.
    The question that has been debated by parents, psychologists and media critics for years is whether such racy content has an adverse effect on young viewers. Now researchers at the Rand Corp. say they have documented for the first time how such exposure can influence teen pregnancy rates. They found that teens exposed to the most sexual content on TV are twice as likely as teens watching less of this material to become pregnant before they reach age 20.

    "The relationship between exposure of this kind of content on TV and the risk of later pregnancy is fairly strong," says Anita Chandra, a behavioral scientist and the study's author. "Even if it were diminished by other contributing factors, the association still holds." Such consistent exposure may explain in part why the U.S. teen pregnancy rate is double that of other industrialized nations. Chandra and her team interviewed 1,461 teens ages 12 to 17 by phone, speaking to them three times between 2001 and '04. While previous studies exploring the effect of TV content on teen pregnancy relied on onetime snapshots of adolescents' behavior, Chandra believes the continuity of her study reinforces the strength of the relationship she found between pregnancy and exposure to sexual content on television.

    Previous research has revealed two major ways that this glamorized perception of sex contributes to teen pregnancy: by encouraging teens to become sexually active early in their adolescence and by promoting inconsistent use of contraceptives. And, notes Dr. Donald Shifrin, former chair of the American Academy of Pediatrics' committee on communications, add to this the fact that children are accessing television not just via the small screen at home but on the computer and increasingly on cell phones, and the opportunities for exposure to sexual content just explode. "It's not just 'appointment' television, now it's anytime television," says Shifrin. "And this study was begun seven years ago, so if it were done today, [the authors] would probably find more evidence of sex on screens that affects youngsters' behaviors."

    Yet it's neither likely nor realistic to expect the television and movie industries to curb the amount of sexual content in their products. That's why the American Academy of Pediatrics created the Media Matters campaign more than a decade ago to promote awareness within the industry of how influential its TV shows and movies are to youngsters and to alert parents to the critical role they play in monitoring and mediating what their children watch. Having ammunition in the form of a study-based association such as Chandra documented just gives the message more impact.
    comment:

    In case you missed it, they are talking about out of wedlock teen pregnancies. As in from Zinah!

    Do your kids have a TV in their bedroom? Do you know what they're watching when you're not there?

    ________________

    See also this thread,

    Teen Birth Rates Higher in Highly Religious States

    http://forum.netmuslims.com/showthre...ed=1#post56630

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    Safe "sexting?" No such thing, teens warned

    By Belinda Goldsmith Belinda Goldsmith - May 4, 2009

    CANBERRA (Reuters Life!) – Teens sending nude or suggestive photos of themselves over their mobile phones are being warned -- "sexting" can damage your future.

    Australia's state government of New South Wales launched an education campaign this week to combat the growing practice of "sexting," saying these images or sexually explicit text messages can be posted on the Internet or forwarded to others, which can end up in harassment or even sexual assault.


    "Sexting," a play on the term texting, has become a concern for parents and schools internationally with the proliferation of mobile phones with cameras and social networking sites, but such images can be classified as child pornography by law.

    "Young people often don't think about the consequences of their actions. What they think is an innocent joke or harmless flirting can be very damaging if it falls into the wrong hands," said NSW Community Service Minister Linda Burney in a statement.

    "It is frightening to think that once these images are online or on a phone, anyone anywhere in the world can access them. It is then impossible to retrieve and delete them. They are there forever and can damage future career prospects or relationships." She said government departments had received reports of girls as young as 13 sending sexually explicit images to their boyfriends on their mobiles phones, which were then passed on to other friends and even further once the relationships ended.

    In the United States, a survey last fall found one in five teenagers said they had sent or posted online nude or semi-nude pictures of themselves and 39 percent said they had sent or posted sexually suggestive messages, according to the National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy.

    Teenage actress Vanessa Hudgens, star of the successful "High School Musical" franchise, last year had to live down the scandal of her semi-nude pictures, meant for boyfriend Zac Ephron, ending up online.

    Several prosecutions have been undertaken or threatened in the United States and one girl, Jessica Logan, 18, from Cincinnati, committed suicide after being taunted when a nude photo of herself sent via text was circulated at her school.

    The NSW government has produced a fact sheet for schools, parents and youngsters to warn about the possible lifetime consequences of sexting while Burney was hitting the airwaves to publicize the campaign: "Safe Sexting, No Such Thing."

    Burney is also urging parents to talk to children about the issue and to check their social networking websites such as MySpace and Facebook for any inappropriate images.

    "More and more parents are telling me how worried they are about their children making a silly mistake that can affect them for the rest of their lives," said Burney.

    "Reports from concerned adults are becoming more frequent... a dangerous consequence is the risk of public humiliation, harassment or even sexual assault."


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    "Sexting" craze on the rise among British children

    By Stefano Ambrogi - August 5, 2009

    LONDON - A growing number of British teenagers are swapping sexually explicit images of themselves on mobile phones leaving them open to bullying and victimization by their peers, police and a children's charity said on Tuesday.

    The practice, known as "sexting," has also resulted in intimate images of children being posted on websites used by pedophiles without the knowledge of the sender, according to Britain's Child Exploitation and Online Protection Center .

    "We are getting an increasing number of reports from the public, children and parents alike, who are concerned about this kind of behavior," said Helen Penn, head of education at CEOP, a law enforcement agency tied to the British police.

    "We have seen an increase in children producing sexual images of themselves, and as a result we are seeing children's normal sexual exploration being translated into public property," she told Reuters.
    Penn said advances in mobile phone technology, including Bluetooth, and the ability to post a picture or video on the internet at the click of a button, was making the practice more widespread with unforeseen consequences.

    "If a relationship breaks down or someone finds that phone, then the image could end up on a website, a social networking site like Facebook, or could even end up in the wrong hands, as has happened, and end up on a pedophile network," Penn said.

    A survey of 2,000 young people released by children's charity Beatbullying on Tuesday found that more than a third of 11 to 18-year-olds had received a sexually explicit text or email.

    It also found that 70 percent of young people knew who had sent the message.

    Chief executive of Beatbullying, Emma-Jane Cross, said it was important parents and schools understood the rise of the phenomenon, which was well documented in the United States and Australia, but comparatively unknown in Britain.

    Girls were particularly vulnerable, the charity said, with evidence showing they were being bullied into taking and sharing intimate pictures by boyfriends.

    CEOP's Penn said another key issue that had been overlooked is that children holding, or distributing indecent images of a person under 18 to someone else, could be breaking the law.

    A survey of 70 young people aged 11 to 16 by CEOP's youth panel found that almost all of those questioned had no idea that holding on to the images or distributing them could be breaking the 2003 Sexual Offences Act.

    "Obviously the law wasn't set up to prosecute children. It was set up to prosecute adults who were distributing this kind of image...but if they're harassment," Penn said.


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    Sex, porn, Jacko top kids' searches in 2009

    by Lance Whitney - December 18, 2009

    Sex, porn, and Michael Jackson were among the most popular items kids searched for online in 2009, as tracked by Symantec's OnlineFamily.Norton.



    Symantec on Thursday revealed the top 100 favorite search terms among children 18 and under found by its free OnlineFamily.Norton service, which helps parents monitor their kids' online searches. Though innocuous terms like Sesame Street and "New Moon"--a popular movie in the Twilight vampire series--made the cut,
    sex showed up fourth on the list for boys and fifth for girls, following YouTube, Google, and Facebook as the three top terms.

    For boys, the top 25 search terms focused on social-networking sites, shopping sites, and certain adult terms. Girls seemed to favor subjects related to music, TV shows and movies, and celebrities.

    Speaking of celebrities, to no one's surprise, the late Michael Jackson was the most searched for celebrity, coming in at number 12, followed by pop singer Taylor Swift at No. 13. Other hot stars that made the list included Miley Cyrus, Britney Spears, Beyonce, the Black Eyed Peas, the Jonas Brothers, Eminem, Rihanna, and Chris Brown (who was in the news this year after admitting that he assaulted ex-girlfriend Rihanna).

    Searching for celebrities online, however, may be hazardous to your PC's health. Symantec has found found that these searches sometimes draw people to dangerous Web sites, which spew out viruses, spam, and other malware.



    Kids seven and under searched for items related to video games, while older kids were heavy into music, with 34 percent of teens and 27 percent of tweens searching for music-related topics. The Miley Cyrus song "Party in the USA" was the most-searched for tune among kids, while "Boom Boom Pow" by the Black Eye Peas took the No. 2 spot.

    Tech terms that popped up on the list included MySpace at No. 8, MSN at No. 33, the iPod Touch at No. 98, and Bing last at No. 100.

    To compile its top 100 list,
    Symantec tracked 14.6 million searches run by users of its OnlineFamily.Norton service and ranked the terms according to ones submitted most frequently to those submitted the least. The terms were collected anonymously, so none could be associated with any specific children or families.



    ===================================


    Kids' Top Searches In 2009: Porn, Sex, YouTube Top The List


    12-19-09

    According to research by Symantec,
    "porn", "sex" and "YouTube" were among the most popular search terms queried by kids, ages 18-and-under, in 2009.

    The lists were compiled by OnlineFamily.Norton, a service provided by Symantec that helps parents monitor kids' activities online. It examined how the most popular search terms varied by gender, as well as by age.

    Here are the top search terms of the year, by age group:
    OnlineFamily.Norton notes,

    Teens and tweens spend most of their search time online on music related subjects (34% and 27%). Kids under the age of seven spend most of their search time online on games (23%).

    The reports includes a list of the 100 most popular search terms among all teens and kids under 18. See the top 20 queries below:



    The most popular search terms, by gender, were as follows:



    According to OnlineFamily.Norton,
    13 percent of boys searched adult topics, whereas only 2 percent of girls did the same.

    CNET explains how Symantec compiled the top terms:
    To compile its top 100 list, Symantec tracked 14.6 million searches run by users of its OnlineFamily.Norton service and ranked the terms according to ones submitted most frequently to those submitted the least. The terms were collected anonymously, so none could be associated with any specific children or families.


    ==============================================

    Kids’ Top 100 Searches of 2009
    • YouTube, Google, and Facebook top the list
    • Sex and Porn round out the top 5
    • Kids spend most of their time searching for music related topics (30%), then TV/movie related topics (12%).
    • The most popular celebrity kids searched for was Michael Jackson. Taylor Swift came in second.
    • Team Jacob won over Team Edward, with Taylor Lautner coming in at #80 and Robert Pattinson being nonexistent in the top 100.
    • Other top celebs on kids’ list of searches include Miley Cyrus, Lady Gaga, Justin Bieber, Selena Gomez, Lil Wayne, Megan Fox, Eminem, Beyonce, Britney Spears, Demi Lovato, Black Eyed Peas, Jonas Brothers, Rihanna, and Chris Brown.
    • Kids are searching for shopping sites like eBay, Walmart, Target, and Best Buy.



    Top Searches of 2009 – Boys vs. Girls
    • YouTube, Google, and Facebook show up in the top three of both boys’ and girls’ search terms.
    • Boys’ #4 search term was Sex while girls’ #4 search term was Taylor Swift. Girls were still interested in Sex, though, with the term coming it at #5.
    • Boys’ most popular celebrity search term was Michael Jackson.
    • Boys’ top 25 search terms were mainly comprised of social networking sites, various websites, shopping sites, inappropriate terms, and games.
    • Girls’ top 25 search terms were main comprised of social networking sites, as well as music and entertainment/celebrity terms.
    • Both boys’ and girls’ most popular search terms were related to music, though it was higher in terms of percentages for girls at 42% compared to boys at 22%.*
    • Boys search more adult topics compared to girls (13% vs. 2%).*



    Top Searches of 2009 – By Age Group
    • Youtube, Facebook, and Google comprise the top 3 search terms for kids.
    • Sex comes in at #4 for teens and tweens while porn comes in #4 for kids 7 and under.
    • Taylor Swift was the top searched for term among teens. For tweens and kids 7 and under, it was Michael Jackson.
    • Teens and tweens spend most of their search time online on music related subjects (34% and 27%).*
    • Kids under the age of seven spend most of their search time online on games (23%).*
    • Kids under the age of seven are conducting searches for P2P sites like Limewire and Mininova.


  9. #9
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    Maybe this is a better option to have on one's pc

    Halal search engine


    http://forum.netmuslims.com/showthre...ed=1#post56684

  10. #10
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    Hard-core porn, violent YouTube videos and online dating

    Devastating new book reveals terrifying truth about what teens REALLY get up to online

    By Chloe Combi - 30 April 2015

    Rachel is a bright, pretty 17-year-old who wants to study medicine. she has lots of friends and when they can slip or charm their way past the watchful bouncers of London’s bars, they like to drink cocktails and enjoy being nearly grown up. She gets on with her parents and younger brother, walks her dog every night and her teachers praise her.

    Once a week, usually Sunday night, she performs solo sex acts on camera for a man she has never met
    called David. After talking to her online for about three months, David persuaded Rachel to start what she calls ‘the sex stuff’. He now has enough ‘sex stuff’ of Rachel on tape that she feels she can neither break contact with him nor stop doing what he asks of her.

    Michael has just turned 16. He has been watching hardcore pornography since he was 11 on either the laptop or the iPhone that his parents bought him. He has, by his own admission, seen ‘every sex act known to man’ in his pornography-viewing career, though he is yet to have sex. He doesn’t see much wrong with watching porn but he does admit to being unable to stop, despite ‘sometimes trying to’.

    Ahmed, 15, likes nothing better ‘when he is bored’ than setting up fake social media profiles and aggressively trolling, in other words verbally abusing, minor celebrities and footballers via the internet.

    Annabelle has set up an online dating profile casting herself as a 21-year-old model. Now, several men in their 30s and 40s are pursuing ‘hook-ups’ with her; modern shorthand for casual sex. She is yet to go through with one of these, the main problem being that she is actually a 16-year-old studying for her GCSEs. Meanwhile, Grant, 14, is being bullied so badly online that he is beginning to take more seriously the ‘hundreds’ of suggestions he gets a day to kill himself. He hasn’t, despite all this, ever considered coming offline — even for a day.

    These were just a few of the shocking experiences of the teenagers I encountered while researching and writing my new book, Generation Z. As a former teacher, I wanted to get to grips with what life is like for a 21st-century teenager in the UK, so I spent two years talking to hundreds of teens from every possible background, ethnicity, class and culture, from all over the country, about a huge number of issues.

    It is perhaps difficult for adults to understand what the internet means to today’s teenagers and, therefore, they find it hard to comprehend how any of the examples listed above are really happening.

    For most of us, the internet is a convenient form of communication, a mode of entertainment, which generally makes our lives easier. For teenagers, it is a window into the world, an identity, a friend, a parent, a guide, a bounty of information, an endless supply of entertainment, a friendship maker or breaker, a source of heartache and a million other things. It is something they obey and seriously believe they cannot live without.

    This is the first generation that grew up from birth under the internet’s watchful eye. It informs and shapes their identity and is the most influential aspect of modern teenage life.
    Certainly, teenagers are more introspective than ever. Being plugged in online 24/7 means that they don’t even have to leave their bedrooms to communicate, socialize or meet new people.

    Friendships and relationships are no longer forged in playgrounds or each other’s houses but on social media; on Facebook pages and other sites where being ‘liked’ in the virtual world counts for more than someone saying ‘I like you’ in person.

    Bullying is no longer a shove in a corridor or a freezing out of a friendship group but expressed in multiple texts or online messages where the victim might have no clue of the sender’s identity.

    Teenage girls and boys no longer seek sex education from textbooks
    with anatomical diagrams, giggling friends or flustered parents; they can get it from films with titles like Teen Ass 2, which they can access on the smartphones that they carry with them at all times.

    This week new figures revealed that sexualized images of women on social media have led to an increase in emotional problems among young girls. Researchers from University College London believe the rise in girls aged between 11 and 13 suffering from emotional problems such as anxiety may be linked to stress brought on by seeing images of women portrayed as sex objects on Facebook, Twitter and other websites.

    Teenagers rarely measure self-esteem or self-worth against personal and scholastic achievements, however brilliant they are, but increasingly by how many people tell them they are ‘hot’ on the photo-sharing website Instagram or other forms of social media.

    As Camilla, 14, told me: ‘Everyone wants to be an Instagram queen and adults don’t get it. You can be “Instagram famous” without being famous at all in the real world.

    ‘To get Instagram famous, you have to be amazing-looking and have the clothes and the body, and do amazing things.’ Sure enough, there is a site called the ‘Rich Kids of Instagram’, featuring spoilt youngsters who spend their time posting pictures of themselves surrounded by piles of cash, or lounging on yachts and private jets. ‘I get so depressed about my life when I see how perfect other people’s lives are on Instagram,’ said Camilla.

    Forums that are so obsessed with material wealth, looks and glamour, like Instagram, encourage in teenagers a similar ferocious materialism and consumerist drive. Many teenagers I spoke to put owning the latest phone as a priority well above getting the political party they support (if they do support one) in power, helping the hungry or seeking world peace.

    Camilla’s observations are telling on a number of levels. They reflect just how distinct from mainstream adult society teenagers are in deciding who the new trendsetters and power brokers are. People seeking fame and fortune eschew the traditional routes of column inches, chart success and TV programs and aim to become ‘YouTube famous’ instead.

    If I was to mention such YouTube stars as ‘Charlieissocoollike’ (24-year-old Charlie McDonnell, who chats and sings in his video blogs, and was the first UK ‘YouTuber’ to hit one million subscribers), or Sprinkleofglitter (Louise Watson, who gives girl-orientated advice on beauty, life and style) to most adults, I would be met with a blank look. Many teenagers, however, consider them virtually close friends, and take everything they say as gospel.

    Camilla’s (and most other teenagers’) obsession with the lives of people online means they are all striving to emulate the glamorous, zany and, let’s face it, entirely airbrushed existence of these modern role models. Not having an online profile if you are a teenager makes you pretty much nonexistent. However, social media enables teenagers to create a kind of much more satisfying cyber alter-ego. Even if they do stick to something that resembles the truth online (unlike Annabelle), they can all be more beautiful, sexier, richer and seem more fun.

    As Ricky, 16, sagely points out: ‘Girls are way worse but of course you put your best pictures up, in your designer threads in some sick [good] looking place or on holiday. My mate took a selfie on a bed and Photoshopped in piles of money! It was so obvious and we mocked him so badly.’

    Digitally adding piles of cash to a picture might sound bizarre to most adults, but when many celebrities employ people to take thousands of seemingly unstaged, selfie-style pictures of them a day, in the most exotic locations, surrounded by the most expensive brands, and then have them professionally altered to make them look even more flawless, it is not surprising that the average teenager begins to feel inadequate.

    The internet is a lawless, unregulated place, where people say and do things they would not consider doing in the ‘real’ world.


    While most teenagers probably do not share Ahmed’s passion for ‘trolling’ famous people, most parents would be fairly shocked about what their kids do online. Whether it is telling a famous person they love them, telling someone they have never met they are ugly, or posting pictures of themselves in fewer clothes than is wise, most of the teenagers I spoke to admitted doing something online they were less than proud of.

    Being behind a screen provides people
    , particularly teenagers who have a tendency not to think about consequences until after the event, with a psychological disconnection, where the polite and civil conventions of real life do not apply.

    In researching my book, I was shown the Facebook profiles of ten anonymous ‘average’ teenagers by a police officer who specializes in internet crime. What they casually post would make most parents want to set the family computer on fire and join an Amish community.

    Grant’s experience of online bullying is awful but not uncommon. In the popular internet forum, Ask.fm, teenagers seeking affirmation and flattery are constantly told by others they are ‘fat’, ‘ugly’, ‘worthless’ and to ‘go and kill yourself’.

    They all crave praise in a world where self-esteem is constantly under attack. As friends Mary and Reshma, 16, told me: ‘It’s all about hotness. You want total strangers telling you that you are buff, that they want to have sex with you. It feels good and makes you feel better about yourself.’

    These teenagers are well used to giving and taking abuse and are also increasingly numb to being shocked by the sex and violence they see online and in films.

    Nothing revealed just how inured they have become as much as the day I showed a large, mixed group the film The Silence Of The Lambs. I remember finding it genuinely disturbing when I was a teenager but they seemed entirely bored and indifferent to it, describing Hannibal Lecter variously as ‘too gay to be a serial killer’, and, ‘a p*ssy who listens to classical music and chats boring s***’. Horrific serial killer Buffalo Bill sent them into paroxysms of mirth and they all agreed they were glad that the horror films they watch now are ‘good’.

    In their world, ‘good’ is extreme violence as entertainment; ‘good’ is depicting torture, sadism, suffering, and human depravity. ‘Good’ is blurring the line between entertainment and reality, where they can watch someone have their head sawn off on YouTube, and then flip on to a video of pop star Rihanna writhing in a sequinned bikini.

    I joined a group of boys watching one of these brutal videos, originally posted by fanatics carrying out executions in the Middle East, which are wildly popular on the internet. Teens search for these videos mostly on YouTube, a site they spend a mindboggling amount of time on (one told me he was looking at it on his phone during his grandmother’s funeral).

    Of the hundreds of thousands of similar ones, the clip I watched had 800,000 views and counting. It was an odd experience, punctuated by cheers and groans of revulsion from the boys with me.

    Clearly they were not differentiating much between the real suffering in these clips and the brutally realistic and stylized depictions of violence they see in modern video games and films. As Tom, 15, pointed out: ‘You do forget that that is a guy who might have, like, kids or parents, or something. I guess people try not to think about that aspect.’

    In a way, the most worrying fact in all this is that neither the internet nor social media is going away. As the 21st century develops, all of us, but particularly the young, are going to become more entrenched in our carefully constructed online worlds and identities.

    It is increasingly important that parents and guardians insist
    on their teenagers living, communicating, forming opinions and experiencing things in the real world. It is crucial for all young people to know that nearly everything online is constructed or fake.

    Sex in the real world is different. Violence in the real world is different. People in the real world are different. And as alluring, fun and glamorous as the internet can be, reality, with all its imperfections, is so much better.


    Generation Z: Their Voices, Their Lives by Chloe Combi is out now and published by Hutchinson at £18.99. Names have been changed to protect the children’s anonymity.

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/ar...rt-phones.html

    comments:

    The parents are responsible for the upbringing of their children, and will be questioned about it on the Day of Judgment. It is a child’s right to be taught Islamic education (morals, etc).

    Abdullah bin Umar reported: The Messenger of Allah (sallallahu alayhi wa sallam) said:

    “Every one of you is a shepherd and is responsible for his flock. The leader of people is a guardian and is responsible for his subjects. A man is the guardian of his family and he is responsible for them. A woman is the guardian of her husband’s home and his children and she is responsible for them. The servant of a man is a guardian of the property of his master and he is responsible for it. Surely, every one of you is a shepherd and responsible for his flock.”


    Sahih Bukhari 6719, Sahih Muslim 1829

  11. #11
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    How Teenage Girls Are Using Sex, Selfies And Social Media To Sell Themselves Online

    by Aileen Donnelly - Mar. 21, 2016

    Advertising agencies, Hollywood producers and music executives have long known that sex sells. And they've used this knowledge to peddle goods and entertainment to men, women and increasingly kids. Now teens are using that same principle to sell themselves.

    Nancy Jo Sales devoted two and a half years to researching her new book American Girls: Social Media and the Secret Lives of Teen*agers. She visited 10 states and talked to more than 200 girls about everything from cyber-bullying to sexting.

    Sales writes about teens on Tinder and middle schoolers casually exchanging nude photos that sometimes get posted to "slut pages." And she describes how these teens are using sexy selfies not only to woo would-be suitors, but to improve their social standing.

    Teens trying to garner the approval of their peers is nothing new, but it wasn't until the social media age that they could actually quantify it. In 2016, being popular means the most Instagram followers, Facebook friends and likes.

    "We've transferred high school popularity into social media measurements," Zoe, a 16-year-old living in L.A., said. "The popularity contest - it's never been a good thing - and now we have the actual numbers, we've become greedy. We want more attention."

    To get that attention, they often turn to classic methods: sex hasn't stopped selling in the social media age. Whether a teen girl posts a seemingly innocuous selfie with a come-hither expression (what 13-year-old Sophia described as her "brand") or a picture of her butt or breasts, the result is almost reliably the same.

    "More provocative equals more likes," said Greta, a 16-year-old who lives in L.A. Even sixth-graders are "posing sexy" these days, a 13-year-old said.

    "If building a social media presence is similar to building a brand, then it makes a warped kind of sense that girls - exposed from the earliest age to sexualized images of women and girls - are promoting their online selves with sex, following the example of the most successful social media celebrities," Sales writes.

    The Kardashians were referenced by teens in almost every chapter. "Girls will post, like, pictures of their butt and say, 'It's art,'"
    said 13-year-old Melinda who lives in Montclair, N.J., "But really, it's just their butt."

    "They're just trying to get more likes," her friend Sophia said. "It's like a cool girl's way of being like the Kardashians."

    The teens described taking dozens of photos to get the right look, and even then feeling like they had to use filters and apps to enhance their butt and face, or edit the pictures themselves in Photoshop.

    "What was striking in hearing them talk about this was how conscious they were of what they were doing, their awareness
    of the inauthenticity of the self they presented on social media," Sales writes.

    But crafting and maintaining a compelling social media persona isn't easy, as Kim Kardashian told Barbara Walters in December 2011 after the interviewer pointed out that the family was famous despite their lack of any discernible talents.

    "I think it's more of a challenge for you to go on a reality show and get people to fall in love with you for being you," Kim said. "There's more pressure to be famous for being yourself than if you're being a character."

    Most teens agreed. The only difference is, they aren't making millions of dollars off their efforts. But not for a lack of trying. The teens described how some of their friends become Instafamous (famous just on Instagram), and then there are the few who become YouTube stars. With the broadcasting power of social media, Sales writes, "comes an enormous thrill: the chance to become not just popular, but actually famous. Famous for just being you."

    Then-15-year-old YouTube star Amanda Steele, who started posting makeup tutorials online when she was just 10 years old, says she gained millions of YouTube followers because "people like it when you're real and raw." But to appear real is "hard work," she said.

    While normal girls can only dream of having almost three million YouTube subscribers, or garnering 10,000 Facebook likes on a single post, they are employing the same techniques to share an idealized version of their "real" lives to advance their social standing among their peers.

    "I think the temptation of being able to self-promote, where it doesn't show who you really are as a person, is just too strong - you can be whoever you want to be on social media," Gabby said. "Everything just revolves around these Internet people we create."

    This sounds freeing, the fact that teenagers can craft their own identities, and be whomever they want to be, if just online. But many of the teens said they felt trapped instead of free. And they attributed symptoms of anxiety and depression to the constant need to perform online.

    "There's so much pressure to be on social media," said 16-year-old Emily, who lives in L.A. "Like if you're not, it's like you don't exist. Or people feel like you're judging them for being on it. Like, what are you, looking down on this generation?"

    A 16-year-old L.A. girl told Sales that "social media is destroying our lives." So why wouldn't they just go off it? "Because then we would have no life," her friend said.


    http://news.nationalpost.com/arts/bo...mselves-online

    comments:

    All of this happening because of exposure to TV, lack of good company, and lack of real values being taught. It's the parents who are setting up their daughters for this through those three things.


 

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