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  1. #41
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    What's the Scoop on Facebook's Timeline?


    What parents need to know


    Kids today are growing up in public – and this is especially true when it comes to Facebook. The almost ubiquitous social network's new Timeline reveals every post your teen ever made on Facebook (read our review to see why we rate the site "off" for kids younger than 13). Unless teens hide old posts and are vigilant about limiting their audience, countless details of their lives appear in pictures, conversations, and random thoughts. The issue here is simple: What they say or do on Facebook adds up and affects their reputations.

    The simplest and most effective way to help your kids protect their reputations and privacy is to make sure they use their privacy settings. Facebook gives users the ability to control the audience for each post, as well as previous posts. Make sure your teens understand how to use the Audience Selector (but know, too, that this means teens can block you from reading their posts.)


    All about the settings


    First, log into Facebook and click on "Privacy Settings" in the upper right-hand corner next to "Home." Under Control Your Default Privacy, select "Custom." The Custom setting allows you to customize the audience for different aspects of your Facebook profile. Your kids need to set controls in each area: How You Connect, How Tags Work, Apps and Websites, Limit the Audience for Past Posts, and Blocked People and Apps.

    The most important privacy settings are reviewed below.


    How You Connect

    Here’s where you can control who can view your Timeline, who can contact you (and how), and who can see certain information. Click on “Edit Settings” and then click into each section to select the level of desired privacy. We recommend selecting “Friends Only” for the settings on this page.

    Pay close attention to the section that says "Who can look up your Timeline by name or contact info?" This setting refers to people who are logged-in users of Facebook. We recommend Friends Only for teens.


    How Tags Work

    These settings allow your kid to control who can tag him or her in posts. We recommend that teens turn on Tag Review, so they can preview posts they're tagged in before they go live. We strongly discourage teens from allowing friends to check them into places because of the real safety and privacy risks of people knowing their location.

    Apps and Websites

    The apps you use on Facebook can access any information you've made public -- that's how they allow you to connect with friends. But you can limit what information can be shared about you by app companies, other websites, and even by your friends. Review each setting with your teen and consider using the strictest settings.

    The very last setting on this page is a key one: Public search. Facebook prevents users registered as teens to be searchable on a search engine. But if your teen has used a different birthdate, they could be searchable. Bottom line, don’t enable public search for teens.


    What do your kids need to know?


    Facebook regularly changes it feature sets. So you will have to stay on top of things and pay attention when they send you notices. But taking the time to make sure your kids have set their privacy settings means your kids will have more control over their reputations and privacy, and you will have more peace of mind.

  2. #42

  3. #43
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    Wa salam!

    A son of one of my friends may be interested in another religion because of facebook. I trying to tell them...

  4. #44
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    Facebook Is Now Recording Everyone You Stalk

    original.jpg

    Do you like looking at the profiles of people you don't know that well on Facebook? Of course you do, because we're all sick and it's fun. One wrinkle: there's now a list of everything you search for on FB.
    Starting today, Facebook says:

    In addition to your other activity, you'll be able to see the searches you're making on Facebook. Just as you can choose to delete any of your posts, you can use the same inline control on Activity Log to remove any of your searches at any time. It's important to remember that no one else can see your Activity Log, including your search activity.

    A Facebook rep tells us the feature is currently rolling out to users, but you should be seeing it soon.

    That last part is important: this is information that's only accesible by you (and Facebook). It's also not retroactive, because that would give the entire Internet a simultaneous panic attack. But if you've got something to hide, just make sure nobody sees that list—or delete your search history, which is an easy option. But it's an option you'll have to keep tabs on atop the rest of your incriminating search history. This stuff is starting to pile up! [Facebook]
    Note: the above screenshot was prepared by a Gizmodo intern. I do not obsessively search for myself on Facebook.

    http://gizmodo.com/5945415/facebook-...edium=linkedin

  5. #45
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    Cellphones and facebook are fertile soil for Israeli spy activities

    GAZA, (PIC)-- Senior Palestinian internal security official Mohamed Lafi warned that the cellular phones and the facebook social networking site are fertile and active ground for Israeli intelligence activities to immerse young men in the quagmire of espionage and treason.

    In a lecture he gave to raise the security awareness of the Gazan society on Sunday, Lafi stressed the need for promoting a Palestinian culture criminalizing any involvement in spying activities for the Israeli occupation.

    Lafi also talked about the means and methods used by the Israeli intelligence to recruit young men, and highlighted the espionage activities that took place before and after the first intifada in 1987 and were more rampant after the emergence of the Palestinian Authority in 1994 and until today.

    He affirmed that the Palestinian internal security apparatus had found after the internal events in the summer of 2007 a file proving the involvement of the Palestinian Authority's security agencies in spying and surveillance activities against the Palestinian resistance, noting that these security agencies still work for the Israeli occupation.

    The security official finally gave tips and guidelines on how to avoid falling into the trap of the Israeli intelligence and urged the parents to raise the awareness of their children about dealing cautiously with the modern communication means and not only teach them how to use such things.

    Link

  6. #46
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    Domestic Spying and Social Media: Google, Facebook “Back Doors” For US Wiretaps


    Andre Damon (4M),- The Obama administration is close to announcing its support for a law that would force Google, Facebook and other Internet communications companies to build back doors for government wiretaps, according to an article in the New York Times Wednesday. [Note: PIPA has already passed!]

    Such a measure would allow intelligence agencies, particularly the FBI, to monitor a vast array of communications, including Facebook messages, chats, and email using services such as Gmail.


    The move comes as the National Security Agency’s sprawling new data center in Utah prepares to come online in September of this year. The facility is rumored to store data on the scale of trillions of terabytes, meaning that it can easily house the contents of every personal computer in the world.

    Under the terms of the 1994 Communications Assistance for Law Enforcement Act, known as CALEA, hardware used to facilitate Internet and voice communications—the networks through which data is transmitted—must have the technical means to allow the government to conduct wiretaps.

    The spying capabilities created in the context of this earlier law made possible the massive illegal domestic spying programs conducted under the Bush administration, and tens of thousands of ongoing secret court-approved wiretaps conducted under Obama. Under Bush, reports emerged that the government was essentially given full access to transmission systems by many Internet Service Providers (ISPs), such as AT&T.

    US intelligence agencies were satisfied with these capabilities up until around 2010, when, in response to a series of security breaches, services such as Gmail and Facebook enabled encryption by default.

    As a result of this move, communications using these services became inaccessible to conventional wiretapping, which relied on intercepting the (now encrypted) data traveling between users and routed by ISPs.

    To offset the effects of encryption, the FBI has sought to force companies to create back doors for surveillance, with varying degrees of success. Following its purchase by Microsoft, Skype, the online chat and voice service, last year voluntarily reengineered its architecture to allow the US and other governments to monitor chat communications.




    The FBI claims that, under current laws, Internet communications companies can effectively refuse to comply with a court-ordered wiretap by claiming that there is no practical way for them to allow the government to spy on their users’ communications.

    The proposed law would force social networks and other communications companies to provide government access or face fines that, according to the Washington Post, would multiply exponentially and threaten companies with bankruptcy.

    While keeping silent on the unconstitutional nature of the US government’s vast domestic spying apparatus, groups representing major Silicon Valley corporations have raised concerns about the difficulty of implementing the proposed government wiretapping capabilities, particularly for start-ups and small companies, which behemoths like Facebook and Apple rely on for developing new technologies.

    According to the Times, officials are working to reformulate the law to satisfy these concerns while forcing the most widely used services to allow wiretapping.

    “While the F.B.I.’s original proposal would have required Internet communications services to each build in a wiretapping capacity, the revised one, which must now be reviewed by the White House, focuses on fining companies that do not comply with wiretap orders,” the Times reported. “The difference, officials say, means that start-ups with a small number of users would have fewer worries about wiretapping issues unless the companies became popular enough to come to the Justice Department’s attention.”

    In addition to forcing Internet communications companies to allow wiretapping, the law would also put even more pressure on ISPs to ensure that they do not break the government’s existing wiretapping capabilities by upgrading their systems.




    The Obama administration’s drive to expand the government’s wiretapping comes in the aftermath of the Boston Marathon bombings, which have been used as the pretext for the implementation of a range of police state measures, including most notably the lockdown of Boston following the blasts. [PIPA was passed while everyone was looking at Boston]

    The Obama administration has claimed that its wiretapping activities are conducted under warrants issued by a FISA court, which essentially rubber-stamp government spying applications. In 2012, the FISA court did not deny a single application for spying.

    However, the full extent of the government’s wiretapping programs is kept totally secret, and its real scope is far more sweeping than what has already been admitted.

    A hint of the potentially vast extent of domestic spying was indicated by Tim Clemente, a former FBI counterterrorism agent, last week, in an interview with CNN’s Erin Burnett. Burnett asked Clemente if there was any way that the government would be able to implicate the widow of Boston Marathon bombing suspect Tamerlan Tsarnaev in playing a role in the bombing.

    Clemente responded by saying, “We certainly have ways in national security investigations to find out exactly what was said in that [phone] conversation. It’s not necessarily something that the FBI is going to want to present in court, but it may help lead the investigation and/or lead to questioning of her.”

    By stating that the evidence would not be admissible in court, Clemente was implying that the evidence was gathered illegally. Faced with skepticism from Burnett about the government’s ability to access such data, Clemente added, “Welcome to America. All of that stuff is being captured as we speak whether we know it or like it or not.”


    http://nsnbc.me/2013/05/10/domestic-...r-us-wiretaps/


  7. #47
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    Goolge Ads "opt out"





    Ads opt out - http://www.google.com/ads/preferences

    Stop having your net history being recordedhttp://history.google.com






  8. #48

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    I was looking up stuff at my home on eBay. A few days later, I was at my mom's house and looking for stuff on eBay on her computer. We live in two different cities and have completely different ISPs. I didn't even log into eBay. I was just browsing. Under recently viewed items, it displayed the items that I looked at using my account at home. I was completely freaked out. The only explanation, is that my Google phone tracks my location and stores that data and then displays it on a new computer. That's just messed up.

  10. #50
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    We are living in times where if you want privacy then live without technology as much as you can. From Video game systems (kinect), smart phones, internet, corporations, webcams, pcs, to your passports (RF chips), everything has a way of and does keep tabs on you.

  11. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hussein View Post
    The only explanation, is that my Google phone tracks my location and stores that data and then displays it on a new computer. That's just messed up.
    That is freaky.

    I've been noticing that whenever I look something up on my laptop, when I'm on my phone and I go to search something on Google, there is a list of everything I looked up on my computer.
    "The strong is not the one who overcomes the people by strength, but the strong is the one who controls himself while in anger." (Sahih Al Bukhari Vol 8. No.135)

  12. #52
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    STOP using Google and Facebook if you fear US spying, says Germany

    * Stay off US websites if you don't want to be spied on, says German minister
    * Spoke in the wake of revelations the NSA have been 'spying' on US citizens


    By Sara Malm - 3 July 2013

    If you are worried about the US spying on you, you need to stop using Google and Facebook, Germany's top security official has warned.

    Internet users who fear their data is being intercepted by U.S. intelligence agencies such as the National Security Agency's should stay away from American websites run through American servers, Interior Minister Hans-Peter Friedrich said.

    Leaked revelations about the NSA’s wholesale information on foreign web users has prompted outrage in Europe and calls for tighter international rules on data protection.

    Leaks by Edward Snowden, a former NSA systems analyst, have revealed the NSA's sweeping data collection of U.S. phone records and some Internet traffic.

    According to U.S. intelligence officials, the programs target foreigners and terrorist suspects mostly overseas.

    Interior Minister Hans-Peter Friedrich told reporters in Berlin on Wednesday that ‘whoever fears their communication is being intercepted in any way should use services that don't go through American servers.’

    Friedrich says German officials are in touch with their U.S. counterparts ‘on all levels’ and a delegation is scheduled to fly to Washington next week to discuss the claims that ordinary citizens and even European diplomats were being spied upon.

    In the wake of the NSA scandal, Friedrich defended the intelligence unit's methods against German criticism.

    In an interview with Welt am Sontag the Interior minister said that that turning against the US is 'not how you deal with friends who are in the fight against terrorism, our most important partners'

    Meanwhile, Snowden is now running out of countries that will take him in - a growing list have either denied his request for asylum or insisted that he make an application on their soil. Earlier today Bolivia's president Evo Morales attacked US 'aggression' after his plane was rerouted last night amid suspicions that NSA leaker Edward Snowden was on board. Morales's officials claim that his plane was forced to land in Austria because France and other European governments countries refused to let it cross their airspace.


    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/arti...s-Germany.html

  13. #53
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    Facebook ignored security bug, researcher posts details on Zuckerberg’s wall





    If your Facebook profile isn’t public, others aren’t supposed to be able to post content on your wall. Khalil Shreateh, a self-confessed IT expert from Palestine, claims to have discovered a vulnerability that lets anyone post a link to other users Facebook walls. Shreateh says he reported the bug to Facebook recently, but instead of taking him seriously he claims the company ignored the problem and decided it wasn’t a bug.

    FACEBOOK DIDN’T TAKE THE BUG REPORT SERIOUSLY

    In a lengthy blog post outlining the timeline of events, Shreateh says he tested the vulnerability on Sarah Goodin — a friend of Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg, and the first woman to sign up to the service — before reporting it through Facebook’s whitehat disclosure service for security researchers. The whitehat service rewards researchers with at least $500 for successful bugs. In a copy of an email sent to Facebook, Shreateh explains the details and notes that the security team might not be able to see his test post as Goodin restricts posts to only her friends. Despite attaching a screenshot of the post, a Facebook security engineer, identified only as Emrakul, replied saying “I am sorry this is not a bug,” without asking for additional information.

    Unperturbed by the response, Shreateh decided to notify Mark Zuckerberg himself by posting to his timeline. Minutes later, Facebook security engineer Ola Okelola contacted Shreateh requesting details on the exploit. Facebook disabled his account, presumably fearing a wider security breach. Shreateh’s account has now been re-enabled, but the company claims his original report “did not have enough technical information” for them to take action. In an email to Shreateh, a Facebook security engineer — identified as Joshua — claims the company is “not able to pay you for this vulnerability because your actions violated our Terms of Service.”

    Although details of the exact exploit do not appear to have been made available publicly, if Shreateh had gone public and not alerted the company using its recommended disclosure policy then it’s likely this type of exploit would have been used to spam Facebook users with malicious links. The Verge has reached out to Facebook to verify the details of the bug and why Shreateh’s reports weren’t taken seriously, and we’ll update you accordingly.

    http://www.alrasub.com/facebook-igno...kerbergs-wall/

  14. #54
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    Facebook 'snoops on your private inbox': Site sued over claim it is scanning and selling details

    • Website accused of monitoring messages to glean advertising preferences
    • The site allegedly sells 'profiles' on to advertisers for higher prices
    • Internet experts examined whether messages were as private as claimed
    • A Facebook spokesman said the claims were 'without merit'


    Facebook is being sued over claims it has been scanning users’ private messages for personal information to sell to advertisers.

    The social networking site, is accused of monitoring messages and website links sent between users so they can profile what people read online.

    This in turn allows the website, which has 24million UK members, to charge more for the information.


    Facebook is accused of monitoring users' private messages to one another to glean personal information that can be sold on to advertising companies

    It is thought the information is particularly valuable because people are more likely to reveal their true interests in messages they think are private.

    The alleged breach of privacy has been exposed by internet experts, who examined whether messages that Facebook insists are private were actually being monitored.

    The claim relates to messages sent directly to a friend’s inbox, rather than posted on a profile wall, which can be seen publicly.

    Many people use private messages to send friends links to other websites, such as news articles, shopping sites or sports blogs.

    Facebook apparently tracked such messages so they could collect data on the interests of people who use the site. Advertising agencies and marketing companies are then allegedly sold this information so they can build up profiles of a person’s interests, and target them accordingly.

    If the linked webpage contains a ‘like’ button, Facebook will activate this so any company who has been ‘liked’ will see the person is interested in their products.

    Google, Yahoo! and LinkedIn are among six companies facing accusations of intercepting communications for profit.

    The allegations have been made in a US lawsuit taken out by Matthew Campbell, from Arkansas, and Michael Hurley, from Oregon.

    Google and Yahoo are among six companies facing accusations of intercepting communications for profit

    They are seeking compensation of either $100 (£60) for each day the practice has gone on, or $10,000 (£6,000) for each of the US users who have had messages intercepted.

    They claim Facebook’s breach of privacy violates the Electronic Communications Privacy Act and California privacy and unfair competition laws.

    While the case only covers users in America, it is believed Facebook members all over the world will have been affected.

    Swiss information security firm High-Tech Bridge researched their claims by sending links through the private messaging services of 50 social media sites, and experts checked to see which of these were then clicked on by the sites – showing they had been tracked.

    But computer expert Graham Cluley said: ‘I don’t see anything necessarily wrong in principle with online services automatically scanning messages between individuals, and examining the links that they are sharing.

    ‘If Facebook’s security team didn’t have such systems in place I would believe them to be disturbingly lax in their duty of care for users.’

    A Facebook spokesman added: ‘We believe the allegations are without merit and we will defend ourselves vigorously.’

    The site has previously paid $20million (£12million) to members who claimed in 2011 that it had used their data without their consent.


    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/arti...#ixzz2pPRoATuD


    FACEBOOK SUED for Alleged Monitoring of Users’ Private Messages



    Social media giant Facebook is being sued for the alleged monitoring of its users’ private messages in order to gather more consumer data that it in turn shares with marketers.

    A federal lawsuit filed Thursday in San Jose, California alleges that Facebook traces the contents of users’ private messages, including links to other websites, “to improve its marketing algorithms and increase its ability to profit from data about Facebook users,” The Los Angeles Times reported.

    A link to another site is read as a “like” of that website. The information contributes to a comprehensive profile on the user’s activity that is collected by Facebook and that eventually becomes material for targeted advertising, the lawsuit claims.

    Two plaintiffs are seeking a class action suit on behalf of all Facebook users who have sent or received a private message in the past two years that contained links.

    The allegations are “without merit,” said Facebook spokeswoman Jackie Rooney.

    “We will defend ourselves vigorously,” she told the LA Times in an emailed statement.

    Hackers News was first to surface Facebook’s supposed practice of scanning private messages and converting links to “likes” in 2012.

    Two weeks ago, a new study showed that Facebook records everything users type on the social networking site, including notes they choose to delete instead of posting.

    Adam Kramer, a data scientist employed by the social network, studied the profiles of 3.9 million people for the study, dubbed “Self-Censorship on Facebook.” Kramer viewed activity on each profile by monitoring its HTML form element, which is made up of HTML code that changes whenever a user types in their Facebook chat, status update, or other areas where they speak to others.

    While Facebook claims it does not track the words that are written in each box, the company is able to determine when characters are typed, how many words are typed, and whether they are posted or deleted. Kramer, with help from student Sauvik Das, spent 17 days tracking “aborted status updates, posts on other people’s timelines, and comments on other posts.”

    The social network site does offer opt-outs for certain advertising features, such as whether a user’s consumer brand likes are shared with others and, perhaps tellingly, the ability to opt out of any future decision to allow third-party sites to use a user’s name or picture in advertisements.

    Facebook – which is again expected to pay no federal taxes this year – is not alone among major tech companies facing lawsuits that claim privacy violations. Google has been sued in federal court, accused of illegally accessing the contents of email sent through its Gmail service, a violation of US wiretapping law.

    Also earlier this month, documents leaked by former NSA contractor Edward Snowden revealed that the National Security Agency has quietly subverted the tools used by online advertising companies in order to track surveillance targets and improve its monitoring ability.

    http://www.secretsofthefed.com/faceb...vate-messages/
    Last edited by islamirama; Dec-14-2014 at 11:11 PM.

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    New App Makes It Easy to Stalk Friends (or Strangers!) Without Them Really Knowing


    Your favorite social networks have asked you to share your location for a while now. They say it’s to bring you closer to the people you love (or might love). But it’s also a way to gather more precious data about you. Now that information is being disseminated and graphed on maps via third-party apps that you haven’t signed up for, the most recent example being Connect.

    Connect is an iOS and web app that premiered Tuesday at the Launch Festival in San Francisco. It culls all the geographic data available from your contacts’ various social networks and compiles it into different sets of maps.

    Where does Connect get that information? It’s pulled from the data crumbs we willingly drop on Twitter, Facebook, Foursquare, Google, Instagram and LinkedIn. While you might expect a few of these networks to track your whereabouts, it’s actually a little startling to see your friends’ (and your own) basic geographic data carved out from its original data set and exploited in one big, collaborative map — especially one that you haven’t authorized to use your information.

    Connect doesn’t actually get data on people that isn’t otherwise available. You can see only your friends’ locations. But seeing it all together is disconcerting at first, especially when you think of how the tables can be turned on you. The address you gave LinkedIn? The location from which you Instagrammed? The last place you were tweeting? Seeing all those moments globbed together into one big feed feels a little stalkerish and brings up bad memories of the privacy issues many people experienced with Apple’s Find My Friends feature.

    On the positive side, Connect can also help you, yes, connect with friends when either you or they are traveling. It’s cool to see, when you’re about to leave for a trip to New York, that an old friend is now living there. The app also lets you see more current information, like the minutes-old check-in from a friend on Foursquare.

    Although the information Connect can gather all depends on how forthcoming your friends are when it comes to checking in on Facebook or Foursquare, there’s still a lot of stuff that most of us aren’t sharp enough to keep tabs on. Here’s a quick run-through of how the app works, for both aspiring stalkers — sorry, we mean old friends — and those who want to make sure their locational information isn’t so easily exploited.

    1. Once you download Connect for iOS, you’ll be asked to allow push notifications so you can see when your friends are nearby or when they post an interesting check-in. (My instinct at this moment is to say no, unless you want to really freak your friends out with your stalker superpowers, although one editor here finds it to be a cool feature.)



    2. Then it’ll ask you to sign up via Facebook. Say yes. This is just the first step in a long process of the app’s deep informational dive. If you feel uncomfortable relinquishing this much information, turn back now.



    3. Above you see the details of all the things it’ll pluck from you and your friends’ profiles. Who knew a random online friendship could allow you so much access to another person’s information! Then it’ll ask you to sign up with your email address.



    4. From there, you’ll be brought to a welcome screen that will offer you a small tour of the app. It’ll introduce you to the search bar feature, which allows you to sort through your friends with filters like job title, school and relationship status.
    Throughout, it’ll also encourage you to add your other social accounts to expand the amount of information the app can collect about your friends (as seen below). Each time you do this, you’ll have to individually sign into each account and allow Connect to access the app’s information.



    5. Finally, you’ll be brought to a map that shows where your clumps of friends are, based on their latest check-ins, Instagram photos, tweets and so on.



    6. You can always enhance the information on your map by going to the toolbar up on the left. From there, tap People Sources.



    7. It’ll display all the networks from which you’re culling your friends’ locational info. You can sign up for more or turn specific networks off anytime you feel like it. (The app is free, but if you want to track location data from LinkedIn, it’s a $2.99 in-app purchase.)



    8. Each time a person checks in somewhere new, you’ll see a red notification on the upper-left corner of the screen.



    9. You can tap it to see a complete feed of the most recent geographic locations of everyone you know/follow on social media. Below the person’s name, location and when she checked in, you’ll see an icon of the social network that provided that information. Keep in mind that not all these people are my “friends.” I just follow some of them on Instagram or Twitter.


    10. When you’re at the main map, everyone’s default location is based on the area he lives in (which he’s probably disclosed somewhere on Facebook). If you want to see everyone’s current location, tap the pin on the bottom-right corner of the screen.



    11. If you want to filter your searches, tap the search bar up top for all sorts of nefarious research.



    12. From there, you can use a string of icons to filter who appears on the map according to certain criteria. Sort of like Facebook Graph search, but with a map.



    13. So, if you’re looking for someone to date, you can easily see who’s available on your map by tapping the heart icon and then picking Single.



    14. Using my own location, Connect shows me all the single men nearest to me. Aren’t I the luckiest belle at the ball?



    15. You can repeat this exercise over and over again with different filters until you find someone you want to add to a list. Look who we have here! A Princeton grad…



    16. If you scroll down, you’ll have the option to add this person to a list. It can either be a generic “Favorites” group or one you’ve specifically created.



    17. Success!



    Though Jason is my friend on Facebook, I want to reiterate that you can add anyone you follow on, say, Twitter or Instagram, to a list and track his movements.

    Needless to say, it’s a strong argument for turning off your location settings on Twitter and maybe disabling your photo map on Instagram.
    In the meantime, creepy folk, go crazy with this thing.


    https://www.yahoo.com/tech/new-app-m...039826303.html

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    Tracking you in 140 characters or less: Researchers develop formula to work out the home location of Twitter users


    • IBM researchers went through Twitter to find 100 different users in the 100 biggest cities in the US
    • They downloaded the last 200 tweets posted by each user, giving them 1.5 million tweets
    • 100,000 of those were generated by Foursquare, giving an exact location
    • Almost 300,000 tweets contained the name of cities listed in the US Geological Service gazetteer
    • Other tweets contained clues to their location like phrases such as 'Let’s Go Red Sox'


    By Daily Mail Reporter | 21 March 2014

    Social media really is the end of privacy, if a new algorithm developed by IBM is anything to go by.

    The tech giant announced on Friday that they have come up with a formula that can track the home city of any Twitter user based on the metadata contained in their last 200 tweets.

    According to The Daily Caller, the formula has an almost 70 percent rate of accuracy.

    It's the latest research finding to highlight the possible danger to privacy and security presented by metadata collection and analysis.

    Researchers say that advertisers looking for specific areas to market and journalists covering major news events have the most to gain from the algorithm.

    Research head Jalal Mahmud said IBM began the process by seeing whether they could predict the location of a Twitter account by analyzing tweets and matching the content against their geotagged metadata.

    One of twitter's options features allows for location tagging.

    The team started by tracking geotagged tweets from the 100 largest cities in America between July and August 2011, and isolated 100 users out of each location.

    Researchers then examined the last 200 tweets from each user, discounting private tweets from the mix, and were left with 1.5 million geotagged tweets from almost 10,000 users.

    Ten percent of the data was then set aside to test against later, while the bulk 90 percent was analyzed layer upon layer to create the location-estimating formula.

    Key to the formula is the additional information users are including in their tweets – 100,000 pulled from the team’s data collection were submitted by users linking their Twitter accounts to the popular Foursquare location-based social networking platform, and in 300,000 other cases, users included the names of cities from the U.S. Geological Service gazetteer in tweets.

    The team also found the national distribution of tweets was more or less constant on a daily basis, which allowed them to isolate user’s time zones based on their tweet pattern.

    Even the specifically-worded content of posts themselves aided tracking when users would type in things like the name of a sports team, for example.

    With their algorithm established, the team then used it on the 10 percent of data set aside before analysis, and found that in less than one second for each individual it was able to correctly identify a user’s home city 68 percent of the time, home state 70 percent, and time zone 80 percent.


    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/arti...#ixzz2wwaGAWRG

  17. #57
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    New app allows users to 'stalk' strangers who are attending the same Facebook events


    Many of us use Facebook to plan parties and invite guests these days and most us of click to say we're attending without giving it much thought. But what if complete strangers, who had also clicked to attend the same event, could then see your profile and personal information without you having a clue?

    Winkli is a new app, hoping to launch in July, which essentially allows people to obtain information about someone before meeting them.

    Essentially a dating app, one of the key pieces of information Winkli sends you about guests at any upcoming events is their relationship status, alongside mutual friends, interests and anything left ‘public’ on that person’s Facebook profile.

    The idea is that you can scout out potential romantic targets before ever meeting them, and even prepare conversations based on their likes or hobbies.

    Other apps only involve or allow you to view people who have voluntarily signed up to them and created a profile of the information they want you to see.

    Controversially Winkli uses Facebook information and does not allow people to opt out of being searchable.

    So by merely clicking 'attending' on an event all your public information becomes available to anyone else attending that event that has downloaded Winkli.

    The only way to avoid this is to manually remove yourself from every event you are invited too.

    However since the app is only taking information left ‘public’ on Facebook it is likely it would not break the websites strict privacy rules.

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/ar...ermission.html

  18. #58
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    Facebook adds privacy checker tool and new default settings to make posts less public


    • Facebook announced the privacy changes on its official blog
    • Default audience for new users has changed from 'Public' to 'Friends'
    • Site is rolling out a privacy checker tool to help users review their settings
    • Changes follow the introduction of anonymous login for apps


    By Victoria Woollaston|23 May 2014

    Facebook is still trying to undo years of complaints about its privacy settings by releasing further update to its controls.

    When new users sign up to the site their default audience is now set to Friends only - it was previously set to Public.

    The site is also rolling out a privacy checker tool to help existing users review their settings and make sure they're not sharing more than they want to.



    The default audience for new Facebook users has been changed from 'Public' to 'Friends' under changes to the site's privacy settings. First-time posters will also see a reminder, pictured, to choose an audience for their post. If they don't make a choice, it will be set to Friends

    The changes follow an update last month that introduced anonymous logins for apps.

    ‘On Facebook you can share whatever you want with whomever you want, from a one-to-one conversation, to friends or to everyone,’ the company said in an official blog post.

    ‘While some people want to post to everyone, others have told us that they are more comfortable sharing with a smaller group, like just their friends.

    ‘We recognise that it is much worse for someone to accidentally share with everyone when they actually meant to share just with friends, compared with the reverse.

    ‘So, going forward, when new people join Facebook, the default audience of their first post will be set to Friends. Previously, for most people, it was set to Public.’



    The site is also rolling out a privacy checker tool to help existing users review their settings. The new tool, pictured, will take users through steps to review things such as who they're posting to, which apps they use, and the privacy of key pieces of information on their profile


    First-time posters will see a reminder to choose an audience for their first post, and if they don’t make a choice, it will be set to Friends.

    All users can change who they are posting to at any time, and can change the privacy of their past posts too.

    Meanwhile, the new privacy checker tool will take users through steps to review things such as who they’re posting to, which apps they use, and the privacy of key pieces of information on their profile.

    ‘We want to do all we can to put power and control in people’s hands,’ continued the blog post.




    ‘This new tool is designed to help people make sure they are sharing with just the audience they want. Everything about how privacy works on Facebook remains the same.’

    The update follows other recent changes including a public posting reminder, that alerts people when they’re about to share a post with everyone, a simplified audience selectors on Facebook for iPhone, and anonymous login and new controls for Facebook Login.

    Anonymous Login, announced in April, lets users log into apps and connect their account on other site without sharing any personal information from Facebook.


    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencete...-settings.html

  19. #59
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    What Facebook Is Doing to Your Brain Is Kind of Shocking.



    In a world where we collect friends like stamps, there’s actually a connection between using social media and being lonely. I was shocked at 0:40. My jaw dropped at 2:20. And — yup — my mind was blown at 3:40.




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    The Facebook Messenger app can basically spy on your life, it appears


    We weren't exactly thrilled with the fact that Facebook has essentially made it mandatory to download a whole separate app on mobile devices just to look at messages, but this news has made us question the move even more.

    We'll be the first to admit that reading the Terms of Service (which Facebook answer questions on here) weren't exactly a priority when we were trying to quickly find out when and where we were meeting our friends, but maaaaaybe we should have.

    One eagle-eyed user actually had a look at the terms and conditions that over 1,000,000,000 of us agreed to and it makes pretty scary reading.

    Seemingly, by accepting the app, you are reportedly allowing Facebook to send text messages without your permission, record audio using your phone's microphone and even take pictures without your knowledge using the camera.

    But if that wasn't enough, it can allegedly read personal data on your phone and send it to others, as well as gaining information from other applications installed. WTF? Can this be real?






    The information was published via Huffington Post by Sam Fiorella back in 2013, but is now drawing a ton of attention as everyone debates whether to download the Messenger app. The article detailed various elements of the agreement and Sam claims he has "posted, word for word, a few of the most aggressive app permissions you've accepted."

    Sure, everyone knows that you're giving up a certain degree of privacy with apps, which can be beneficial when it comes to saving preferences and targeting adverts, but this list of permissions is pretty terrifying, TBH.

    While you can choose to delete the app or fiddle with the less-than-straightforward security settings to protect yourself, it's still a rather unsettling sign of the direction things are going in.

    What next? Giving your card details just to play Candy Crush Saga or exchanging your friends' email addresses to access your tweets? No thank you.



    UPDATE: Facebook reps have since contacted Cosmo to explain that there has, in their view, been a few misunderstandings over the terms mentioned, which they claim are set by Google Play and are specific to Android.
    They have also told us that the terms are the same for any app downloaded via Android, not just Facebook and that the phrasing doesn't necessarily reflect the way Facebook uses them. However, in either event these terms are reportedly outdated and have since been changed.

    http://www.cosmopolitan.co.uk/report...pp-spy-record/

    Facebook New App and Privacy



 

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